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C.D. Grote-Flores, G.V. Latigo, J.O. Bradford and J.O. Kuti

Guayule shrub (Parthenium argentatum Gray) is a source of natural rubber resin and latex. Because guayule does not produce natural antioxidants, considerable amounts of rubber and resin are lost after harvest. The effect of long (2–7 years) cold storage on postharvest stability of rubber and resin contents in selected dryland guayule breeding lines were compared. While most genotypes tested showed significant decline in rubber and/or resin content during the storage, few genotypes consistently maintained or increased the amounts of rubber or resin content during storage. The mechanisms of postharvest degradation or synthesis of rubber and resin in harvested guayule plant materials need to be studied further.

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Katrina J.M. Hodgson-Kratky, Olivier M. Stoffyn and David J. Wolyn

Natural rubber is an essential material used in more than 50,000 products, including tires and medical equipment, because of its intrinsic properties such as impact resistance and high elasticity ( Cornish, 2017 ). This strategic commodity is mainly

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Barbara C. Hellier

for two, the taxonomy was questionable. T. kok-saghyz is of interest to scientists in the United States and around the world as a source of natural rubber from a temperate plant. T. kok-saghyz is native to southeastern Kazakhstan in the area of the

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Katrina J.M. Hodgson-Kratky and David J. Wolyn

natural rubber, essential for the fabrication of over 40,000 products vital to industries including transportation, health care, and construction ( Mooibroek and Cornish, 2000 ). TKS grows well in southern Ontario and the northern United States, and it is

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Katrina J.M. Hodgson-Kratky, Olivier M. Stoffyn and David J. Wolyn

Russian dandelion is a cross-pollinated, self-incompatible diploid species ( Warmke, 1943 ) that may be grown as a source of natural rubber in North America. TKS is adapted to southern Canada and the northern United States; however, it requires

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Katrina J.M. Hodgson-Kratky and David J. Wolyn

male sterility in maize under different environmental conditions Crop Sci. 49 77 84 Whaley, W.G. Bowen, J.S. 1947 Russian dandelion (kok-saghyz) an emergency source of natural rubber. Misc. Publ. No. 618. U.S. Govt. Printing Office, Washington, DC

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G.V. Latigo, J.R. Smart and J.O. Kuti

Guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray) is a promising alternative to rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.) for production of natural rubber in semiarid regions. For guayule to be commercially viable, substantial improvement in rubber yield is needed. Field studies were conducted on a dryland site in south Texas to evaluate productivity of selected guayule genotypes from Arizona and California. After 34 months of growth, no significant differences (p= 0.05) were found among the genotypes for rubber yield. However, rubber yields for most of the genotypes increased more than 3-fold from that of last year (1992) yields. Genotype `N9-5' from Arizona had the highest yield (1,239 kg ha-1). Survivability of the genotypes has progressively decreased over the years and survival rates for this year (1993) ranged from 48-25%.

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G.V. Latigo, J Smart, J.O. Bradford and J.O. Kuti

Guayule (Parthenium argentatum Gray) is a promising alternative to (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.) for rubber production in semiarid regions. Substantial improvement in yield is needed to establish guayule as a competitive source of natural rubber. A 4-year field study was conducted on a dryland site in southern Texas to evaluate productivity of selected guayule breeding lines from Arizona and California. Plants were harvested at the age of 22, 34, and 46 months and analyzed for dry weight, resin content, rubber content, resin yield, rubber yield, and percent mortality. While significant differences (P = 0.05) were found for dry weight, resin content, and rubber content within the harvest dates and among the guayule lines, no significant differences were found for rubber content between the harvest dates for each genotypes. Phytomass was highly correlated (r = 0.94) with rubber yield. Survivorship of all the guayule lines decreased progressively over the experimental period and mortality rates ranged from 38% to 67 %. Guayule lines `UC102' from California and `N6-5' and `P3-1' from Arizona were ranked highest for all traits measured.

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Ray F. Dawson and F.W. Owen Smith

Production of rubber from Hevea brasiliensis (Willd. ex A. Juss) Muell.-Arg. (Euphorbiaceae) is greatest in southeastern Asia where the South American leaf blight disease is absent. Except for the Pacific Piedmont of Guatemala, plantation production in the Americas is limited severely by the now widespread presence of the pathogen Microcyclus ulei (P. Henn.) Arx. Mean latex yields from trees growing on the Piedmont approximate those of Indonesia and Malaysia, with little evidence of damage from leaf blight. The scope and scale of the Guatemalan anomaly suggest that environmentally modulated escape rather than previously assumed disease resistance may be the key to successful production of natural rubber in this hemisphere. The Guatemalan industry is presently well-organized to service regional markets in Mexico and the Caribbean Basin. Given due attention to environmental analysis, it may serve also as a model for the development of regional production facilities in other parts of tropical America.

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Griffin M. Bates, Sarah K. McNulty, Nikita D. Amstutz, Victor K. Pool and Katrina Cornish

Natural rubber is a vital resource for the world economy, being used in more than 50,000 commercial products ( Indian Rubber Board, 2013 ). A relatively high-value agricultural commodity, by the year 2020, the world is expected to suffer a natural