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undocumented exotics to the ROVA flora database bringing the total number of known exotics in the history of ROVA to at least 163. Cultural landscape and natural resource area survey results. The CLR's review provided a total of 170 species that were searched

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complex and often difficult to be traced back because of long history of cultivation in Japan ( Iketani et al., 2007 ). Kato et al. (2014) attempted to trace the origins of japanese flowering cherry cultivars, including P. × yedoensis cultivars and

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overlap completely. This history emphasizes how redundancy planning, plant exchange, and active propagation of living plant collections help mitigate unplanned loss by natural disasters ( Bergquist, 2009 , 2010 ; Dosmann and Del Tredici, 2003 ). In

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to establish a competitive leadership position, to be well postured for anticipated technological advances, and to pursue the promise of untold riches awaiting those who do not hesitate. Such has been the history of IA, long before vertical stacking

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Abstract

Consumer interest in cultivating rare plants can be a mixed blessing for the industry and the environment. To commercial growers the demand represents opportunity, but many find the lack of reliable information on materials and production methods discouraging. Some growers may resort to wholesale field-collection of certain species, posing the real threat of extinction. Ironically, the demand for these plants may result from an increasing appreciation of their unique natural history.

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Author:

, David Voegtlin of the Illinois Natural History Survey for aphid identification, and Houston Hobbs of the University of Illinois-Dept. of Crop Sciences for virus determination. The use of trade names in this publication does not imply endorsement of the

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constitute a guarantee or warranty of the product by the Illinois Natural History Survey, the Univ. of Illinois, or the USDA and does not imply its approval to the exclusion of other products that may also be suitable. The cost of publishing this paper was

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Authors: and

We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Don R. Reynolds, Curator of Botany, Natural History Museum, Los Angeles, Calif., for identification of the fungus and its associated fruiting bodies that compose the sooty mold growth on the leaves in this

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Illinois Natural History Survey and does not imply its approval to the exclusion of other products or vendors which also may be suitable.

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