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McKenzie Thomas, Kimberly Jensen, Margarita Velandia, Christopher Clark, Burton English, Dayton Lambert, and Forbes Walker

attributes as a simultaneous choice. The six gardening practices considered in this study are planting pollinator plants, composting, recycling gardening packaging, rainwater collectors, using organic gardening methods, and soil testing. The six gardening

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Hector Eduardo Pérez, Carrie Reinhardt Adams, Michael E. Kane, Jeffrey G. Norcini, Glenn Acomb, and Claudia Larsen

driven increases in gardening and landscaping or the use of native plants in these activities. However, more female students took part in the survey than males. This type of response mirrors the general trend that females are more involved in gardening or

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Diane M. Narem, Mary Hockenberry Meyer, Chengyan Yue, and Nicole Roth

The demand for native plants has been increasing as consumers exhibit stronger interest in sustainable gardening and landscaping ( Brzuszek et al., 2010 ; Hamill, 2005 ; Helfand et al., 2006 ; Kiesling and Manning, 2010 ; Yue et al., 2015 ). A

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Bryn Takle, Cynthia Haynes, and Denny Schrock

group to be significantly different from one another. Continuing education. The data indicate that Iowa Master Gardeners have a strong interest in learning more about native plants (mean 3.41) and sustainable horticultural practices (mean 3.24) as

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Aino-Maija Evers, Leena Lindén, and Erja Rappe

Approaches using human issues in horticulture (HIH) offer new possibilities to develop nearby nature in cities, especially during a period of rapid urbanization in Finland. New initiatives have been developed in school gardening, environmental education, gardening in training programs for disabled people, therapeutic environments in hospitals and institutions, and in the University of Helsinki horticultural education and research programs. At the University of Helsinki, two contact teaching courses and national seminars were organized in 1996 and 1998. Initial studies in the HIH approach have three main themes: 1) gardening as a tool for better quality of life in homes for the elderly, 2) ecology, native plants and extensive maintenance in parks, and 3) the use of horticulture in environment and science education at the lower level of the comprehensive school.

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Allen D. Owings

The LSU Agricultural Center and Louisiana Association of Nurserymen initiated an ornamental plant promotion and recommendation program in 1996. Called `Louisiana Select', this program is intended to actively promote outstanding ornamental plants to Louisiana's gardening consumers. Plants are promoted in the spring and fall of each year and have included `New Orleans Red' coleus, mayhaw, `Henry's Garnet' Virginia willow, `Homestead Purple' verbena, `Watchet' azalea, `Telstar' dianthus, bald cypress, `New Wonder' scaevola, “Fall is for Planting Native Trees”, and lantana (`New Gold', `Dallas Red', `Confetti', `Trailing Purple', and `Silver Mound'). Point of purchase signs and banners promoting the `Louisiana Select' program and individual plants are provided to retail garden centers. Significant sales increases ranging from 300% to 2500% have been reported for the selected plants, with annual bedding plants and perennial flowers enjoying the greater sales increases. Plants for promotion are selected by a committee of wholesale greenhouse producers, retailers, landscape contractors, and cooperative extension service personnel.

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Allen D. Owings

The LSU Agricultural Center and Louisiana Nursery and Landscape Association initiated an ornamental plant promtion, marketing, and recommendation program in 1996. Called `Louisiana Select', this program is intended to actively promote outstanding ornamental plants to Louisiana's gardening consumers. In addition, it provides county agents and industry professionals information on plants that should be recommended. The selection committee consists of an extension horticulturist, two county agents, a landscape contractor, a wholesale greenhouse grower, a wholesale woody ornamental producer, and two representatives from retail garden centers. Plants are usually promoted in the spring and fall of each year. Plants previously named as Louisiana Select recipients include `New Orleans Red' (Red Ruffle) coleus, mayhaw, `Henry's Garnet' virginia sweetspire, `Homestead Purple' perennial verbena, `Telstar' dianthus, bald cypress, `New Gold' lantana, `Confetti' lantana, `Trailing Purple' lantana, `Dallas Red' lantana, `Silver Mound' lantana, `Lady in Red' salvia, `New Wonder' scaevola, `Goldsturm' rudbeckia, and `Foxy' fox-glove. A theme (“Fall is for Planting Native Trees”) has also been promoted. Point of purchase signs promoting the Louisiana Select program and individual plants are made available to garden centers. Significant sales increases ranging from 300% to 2500% have been reported for seelcted plants with annual bedding plants and perennial flowers enjoying the greater sales volume increases.

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Renee Keydoszius and Mary Haque

During the fall semester of 2003, a Clemson University introductory landscape design class collaborated with South Carolina Botanical Gardens staff and coordinators of Sprouting Wings, an after school gardening program for at risk children, to design an exploratory Children's Garden within the Botanical Gardens. Project methodology included site selection, research, site analysis, conceptual diagrams, preliminary designs, and full color renderings of final designs. Students periodically presented their progress on the project to the clients in order to receive feedback and advice. One of the thirteen themed gardens designed is the Wonders of Water Garden. Project goals were to create a center for environmental education addressing current issues in water quality such as pollution from industries and runoff, erosion, stream degradation, and sedimentation resulting from land clearing and development. Visitors will be able to observe and learn about various environmental factors affecting native plant and animal life. The garden will help to teach environmental stewardship and understanding of general aquatic ecology. An observation deck, serpentine bridge through a bog garden, and a bridge crossing a waterfall stream will allow close observation of native aquatic plant and animal life. The Wonders of Water Garden design includes the bog garden and carnivorous garden that border two pools connected by a stream of small waterfalls which may be used to create awareness of current water quality issues and serve as a model to teach visitors the importance of water and aquatic plants in the environment.

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James C. Sellmer

Bringing Nature Home: How Native Plants Sustain Wildlife in Our Gardens. Douglas W. Tallamy. 2007. Timber Press, Inc., Portland, OR. 288 pages, with illustrations. $27.95, Hardcover. ISBN-13:978-0-88192-854-9. Bringing Nature Home is the first

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Robert F. Brzuszek, Richard L. Harkess, and Lelia Kelly

volunteers to surveys, questionnaires, and plant evaluations is vital to aid researchers and extension educators in evaluating the needs and knowledge of the gardening public. The objective of this study was to survey the use of native plants among a