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Mineral Nutrition and Plant Disease. Lawrence E. Datnoff, Wade H. Elmer, and Don M. Huber (editors). 2007. APS Press, St. Paul, MN. 278 pages. $89.00 Hardcover. ISBN 978-0-89054-346-7. This book covers the relationship of mineral nutrients

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at ECs of 4.4 and 7.4 dS·m –1 . The objective of our study was to investigate the effects of saline solution irrigation on the physiological responses and mineral nutrition status of 12 viburnum taxa. Materials and Methods Plant materials and

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., 2008 ). Leaf Mn is often high in blueberry due to the acidic growing conditions ( Retamales and Hancock, 2012 ). Relationships between key chemical compost traits and plant growth and mineral nutrition of northern highbush blueberry One of the primary

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Experiments were performed in 1995 and 1996 at the Mississippi State Univ. Agricultural Experiment Station, Pototoc Ridge, to investigate the effect of Accel and carbaryl sprayed 2 weeks postbloom on fruit set, yield, and plant nutrition of three apple cultivars (Empire, Jon-A-Red, and Braeburn). The treatments consisted of Accel 25 ppm, Accel 50 ppm, Accel 75 ppm, Carbaryl 0.05%, Carbaryl 0.1%, Carbaryl 0.2%, and an unsprayed control. Thinning trials using the two bioregulators conducted over 2 years indicated that Accel and Carbaryl consistently thinned the apple cultivars and increased the yields. Leaf mineral concentrations were affect by the treatments. In 1995, the treatments affected leaf concentrations of N, Ca, and Mg, while in 1996 the treatments affected the leaf contents of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, and Zn, but no copper. The treatments also affected the fruit flesh mineral concentration by increasing the contents of K, P, and Mg in 1996. It can therefore be concluded that, depending on apple cultivar, N content was reduced by the treatments while Ca and Mg were generally increased. Similarly, the fruit flesh contents of Fe, K, P, and Mg were also increased. The two bioregulators therefore thin apples, increase yields, and affect the fruit quality.

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Marschner’s mineral nutrition of higher plants. 3rd Ed. Academic Press, Inc., New York, NY McBride, K. Henny, R.J. Chen, J. Mellich, T.A. 2014 Effect of light intensity and nutritional level on growth and flowering of Adenium obesum ‘Red’ and Ice Pink

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Abstract

There are several avenues the modern plant scientist can use to study the genetic basis of mineral nutrition. The one that has been most widely followed to date could be termed the classical genetic or breeding approach, which involves collecting and screening germplasm for a particular phenotypic trait. For mineral nutritionists, this might involve looking for plants resistant to stressfully low levels of minerals (Gabelman and Gerloff, 1983) or for plants resistant to high levels of a toxic ion or salt (Rush and Epstein, 1981). A second approach, made possible in part by recent advances in recombinant DNA techniques, could be termed a molecular genetic approach. In this case, the researcher first identifies and isolates a specific gene or gene product that is suspected to play a role in mineral nutrition. Each of these approaches has advantages and disadvantages, as described below.

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Abstract

Plants growing in nature provide a continuous array of biological efficiencies related to mineral nutrition. Nearly all of the temperate and tropical areas of the earth are covered with species adapted to the unique properties of particular soils. These properties may represent the extremes in element availability from very deficient to toxic levels and may be associated with wide ranges in pH.

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Abstract

In the article “Interaction between an Indigenous Endomycorrhizal Fungus and Mineral Nutrition of Rosa multiflora Understock” by D.R. Paterson, Ruth A. Taber, H.B. Pemberton, and D.R. Earhart (HortScience 21:312-313, Apr. 1986), the last line of data in Table 1 was printed incorrectly.

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Tree performance and fruit quality at harvest and after storage and leaf mineral nutrition in 28 strains of `Delicious' apple were studied over several years. `Classic Red', `Hi-Early`, `Nured Royal', `Rose Red', and `Sharp Red' had bigger trunk cross sectional area (TCSA), while `Starking`, 'August Red`, and `Apex' had both bigger TCSA and cumulative yields. `Red King Oregon Spur' and `Improved Ryan Spur' had a high yield efficiency. `Aomori' `Atwood', `Redchief`, and `Hardispur' had low cumulative yields and yield efficiencies. `Rose Red', `Red King Oregon Spur', `Ace', `Imperial', `Starking', and `Wellspur' had heavier fruit, while `August Red', `Hardispur' and `Starkrimson' had smaller fruit than most other strains. `Starkspur Supreme' had the highest L/D ratio and `Early Red One' and `Rose Red` had higher red color than those of all other strains. `Aomori', `Hardispur`, `Nured Royal', `Silverspur` and `Starkrimson' had high soluble solids concentrations. Differences were observed in the leaf mineral concentrations between different strains. `Apex', `Classic Red' and `Silverspur' had a high overall acceptability, while `Sturdeespur', `Hardispur' and `Aomori' were not acceptable.

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Coniferous forest trees showing chlorosis and dieback appear to be deficient in Ca and Mg. These deficiencies may be induced by nitrogenous nutrients borne in the atmosphere. This study assessed the roles of nitrogen nutrition and soil on nutrient accumulation by red spruce (Picea rubens, Sarg.) and radishes (Raphanus sativus, L.). Plants were grown in the greenhouse in acid O or A horizons (Typic Haplorthod) collected from a red spruce forest. Plants were grown with a complete nutrient solution with 15 mM N of which NH4 was 0, 3.75, 7.5, 11.25, or 15 mM with the remainder being NO3 -. After 120 days, the spruce needles became chlorotic with 11.25 or 15 mM NH4. Radishes exhibited NH4-toxicity after 28 days. Radishes were larger in the O horizon than in the A horizon. As NH4 was increased, radishes had lesser dry weights and accumulated less foliar Ca. Foliar Ca also was lower in spruce with the higher NH4. Magnesium concentrations in leaves of red spruce and radishes were not affected significantly by increasing NH4 supply. Radishes are suitable indicator plants to study the effect of nitrogen form on mineral nutrition of spruce because each species responded similarly to the treatments.

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