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suitability of the different genotypes to be grown in a floating system. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of nutrient solution concentration (4, 20, 36, 52, and 68 mequiv · L −1 ) on biomass production, mineral composition, and the major

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K on greenhouse-grown lettuce plant height, biomass accumulation, mineral nutrient uptake, and soluble sugar concentrations. Materials and Methods Plant material, growing conditions, and treatments. Seeds of ‘Cimmaron’ lettuce (Harris Seeds

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the lowest was at 25%. The NC of 25% increased Mg content significantly compared with 50%, 75%, and 100% NC. The 100% recommended NC improved Fe and Mn contents significantly ( Table 5 ). Table 5. Effect of nutrient concentration on fruit mineral

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. Leaf mineral nutrients. Leaf samples (20 fully developed leaves from new growth) from developed plants were dried at 70 °C for 2 d and analyzed for mineral nutrient concentration at the Univ. of Georgia Agricultural & Environmental Services Laboratories

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Abbreviations: SSC, soluble solids concentration; TA, total acids; TCSA, trunk cross-sectional area. 1 Tree Fruit Physiologist, to whom reprint requests should be addressed. Present address: Univ. of Idaho, SW Idaho Research and Extension Center

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Abstract

Pickling cucumbers (Cucumis sativus L.) were grown at high plant population (250,000 plants/ha) for once-over harvest. Nitrogen was applied preplant, 0 to 268 kg/ha, and sidedress, 0 to 112 kg/ha, from 2 N sources, NH4NO3 and urea. The effects of N fertilization practices on mineral nutrient composition of the tissue was studied. The concentration of NO3-N in leaf blade and petiole tissue rapidly decreased during the last 2 to 3 weeks before harvest (fruit sizing period). Preplant and sidedress N fertilizer applications led to increased tissue concentration of NO3-N and total N. Petiole tissue concentration less than 0.8% NO3-N or greater than 1.5% at harvest usually reflected reduced yields. Optimum yields generally occurred when blades contained 4 to 5% total N. The source of N fertilizer used had little influence on tissue concentration of NO3-N and total N. Nitrogen fertilization practices had a direct influence on the mineral nutrient composition of the leaf tissue at harvest. Tissue concentration of K, Ca, Mg, Fe and Mn were higher in tissue that received preplant fertilizer N rates from 67 to 201 kg/ha compared to plants that received no preplant N, while the Na concn was reduced. Sidedressing N fertilizer had little influence on cation and anion accumulation in the tissue.

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Uniconazole was applied as a foliar spray at 0, 90, 130, 170, or 210 mg·liter-1 to rooted stem cuttings of `Spectabilis' forsythia (Forsythia ×intermedia Zab.) potted in calcined clay. Plants were harvested 0, 40, 80, 120, and 369 days after treatment (DAT). Treatment with uniconazole at 90 to 210 mg·liter suppressed leaf area and dry weight an average of 16% and 18%, respectively, compared to the nontreated controls when averaged over all harvest periods. Stem and root dry weight suppression was greatest at 80 DAT, 47% and 37%, respectively. Uniconazole suppressed root length from 15% to 36% and root area from 15% to 33% depending on harvest date. Internode length and stem diameter of uniconazole-treated plants were suppressed at all harvests except 369 DAT. Uniconazole resulted in increased and decreased root: shoot ratios 40 and 80 DAT, respectively; while root: shoot ratios were not affected for the remainder of the study. Relative growth rates of leaves, stems, and roots decreased with increasing uniconazole concentration; however, no relative growth rates were suppressed beyond 80 DAT. Generally, mineral nutrient concentrations increased as a result of uniconazole application. The proportion of mineral nutrients allocated to leaves and roots was not affected while the proportion of nutrients allocated to stems decreased with uniconazole application compared to the controls. Chemical name used: (E)-1-(p-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-1-penten-3-ol (uniconazole).

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, 1987 ). In conditions of mineral deficiency, some nutrients may be translocated from the mature leaves and fruits to the younger leaves ( Ho et al., 1993 ). However, a suboptimal concentration of nutrients in the mature leaves can be considered less

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cultivars in leaf nutrient levels and speculated that this was because of their similar parentage. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of sample date on primocane leaf nutrient concentration in trailing, erect, and semierect blackberry

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To observe changes in the nutritional status of corollas during development and senescence, Petunia ×hybrida cv. Mitchell corollas were analyzed for macronutrient and micronutrient content, dry weight, fresh weight, and ethylene production. Carbon content decreased at slightly lower rates than dry weight during corolla development between anthesis and senescence, while fresh weight and ethylene production followed patterns expected of climacteric flowers. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium content declined during development. Both phosphorus and potassium content gradually declined throughout development with overall losses of about 75% and 40%, respectively. Nitrogen content declined 50% during development but losses occurred only during the final stages of senescence. No significant changes were observed in sulfur, calcium, magnesium, and micronutrient content of the corollas during development. Most elements were present in much lower concentrations in corollas than in leaves. The concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and manganese were about 1-, 5-, and 15-fold lower in corollas than in leaves, respectively. Results indicate that remobilization of selected macronutrients from corollas occurred before and during senescence. Taken together with the presence of low concentrations of macronutrients, my data support the contention that petunia corollas are nutritionally in expensive and therefore easily disposable organs.

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