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J. Sci. Med. Sport 13 496 502 Park, S.A. Shoemaker, C.A. Haub, M.D. 2008a How to measure exercise intensity of gardening tasks as a physical activity for older adults using metabolic equivalents Acta Hort. 775 37 40 Park, S.A. Shoemaker, C.A. Haub, M

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physical activity, such as housework and walking for transportation ( Caspersen et al., 1985 ). Metabolic equivalents are used to express the exercise intensity associated with a physical activity ( Norton et al., 2010 ). The MET value for a specific

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rate response, and metabolic equivalents (METs) of adults taking part in children’s games J. Sports Med. Phys. Fitness 44 398 403 Gunn, S.M. Brooks, A.G. Withers, R.T. Gore, C.J. Owen, N. Booth, M.L. Bauman, A.E. 2002 Determining energy expenditure

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In asparagus, there is a tight link between carbohydrate supplies and the metabolic activity of the spear ( Irving and Hurst, 1993 ; King et al., 1990 ; Lill et al., 1990 ; Papadopoulou et al., 2001 ; Saltveit and Kasmire, 1985 ). In intact

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measured through indirect calorimetry using a submaximal graded exercise test (GXT) in a laboratory. Based on the values of HR and VO 2 from the gardening tasks, metabolic equivalents (METs) were calculated. METs are a common measure of exercise intensity

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metabolomes (i.e., beneficial and essential elements used in metabolic and physiological processes) of pecan or other Carya species or even for any plant species. Thus, composition of the biological periodic table [i.e., elements playing a positive role in

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symbiotic plants are exposed to virulent pathogens ( Redman et al., 1999 ) compared with nonsymbiotic plants. Finally, high levels of stress induce metabolic imbalances in plants resulting in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Plants colonized

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., 1989 ). Mechanical injury has been correlated with metabolic disorders and quality changes in fruits and vegetables. Decreased soluble solids content in grape ( Morris et al., 1979 ), decreased firmness in cucumber ( Miller et al., 1987 ), and changes

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quantified spectrophotometrically at 765 nm. The total polyphenol concentration was expressed as weight of gallic acid equivalent/100 g fresh weight. Chromatographic analyses of crude european plum fractions (polyphenolic extracts) were performed on an ultra

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equivalent level under heat stress and the control temperature ( Fig. 3 ). Alanine and serine are constituents of many proteins and involved in various metabolic processes ( Bourguignon et al., 1999 ). The decline in alanine and serine abundance under heat

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