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23 °C, as recommended for Eustoma growth ( Harbaugh, 1995 ; Harbaugh and Woltz, 1991 ; Islam et al., 2004 ). Table 1. Nutrient formulations used to induce nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), or magnesium (Mg) deficiencies in

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Magnesium is an essential mineral element for plant. It is the most abundant divalent cation in the cytosol of plant cells and plays a critical role in many physiological processes and reactions, such as photosynthesis, photophosphorylation, protein

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) found that Mg concentration in grafted plants is lower than in their counterpart nongrafted. Fig. 3. Concentration of magnesium (Mg) in leaves of nongrafted (NG) and grafted (Gad, TZ) melons fertigated with standard or enriched fertilizer (2014 and 2015

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is standard for retail media producers to add lime to their mixes. The addition of lime helps balance pH and supplies calcium and magnesium, essential elements for plant growth. Liming rates vary based on plant species, medium components, and lime

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the southern Atlantic coastal plain, nutrient deficiencies are common and corrective or prophylactic fertilization may be needed ( Gilman, 1987 ; Gilman et al., 2000 ). Palms (Arecaceae) in particular, which have high potassium, magnesium, and

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macronutrient treatments: Ca applied as calcium sulfate (23% Ca and 18% S) at 45 kg⋅ha −1 ; Mg applied as magnesium sulfate (10% Mg and 14% S) at 45 kg⋅ha −1 ; Ca + Mg applied at 22.5 kg⋅ha −1 each; and a grower standard treatment receiving only basal Ca and Mg

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sweetpotato storage root mineral contents (especially trace minerals) are limited, particularly for African sweetpotato germplasm. Bradbury and Holloway (1988) reported storage root mineral content ranges of ≈75 to 740 ppm calcium, ≈180 to 350 ppm magnesium

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soil phosphorus (P), potassium (K), and magnesium (Mg) concentrations in plots mulched with organic mulches or none, but we are unaware of any studies documenting the effects of above versus below mulch applications of fertilizers on soil nutrient

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Abstract

Three cultivars of cabbage (Brassica oleracea L., Capitata group, cvs. Grandslam, Hybrid H, Resistant Danish) were field-grown during 1977 and 1978 to determine the relationship between the percentage of soil-exchangeable Ca, Mg, and K and yield, black speck disease severity and leaf Ca, Mg, K, N, P, Fe, Mn, B, Cu, Zn, and Al concentrations. Highest yields were obtained in soil with a cation exchange capacity of 5% Mg, 5% K and 75–80% Ca. Magnesium and K soil treatments had little consistent effect on elemental leaf concentrations. Leaf Cu and cultivar were related to severity of black speck. The cultivar showing no disease symptoms also had the lowest leaf Cu concentrations.

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In a sand culture study, increasing Na levels increased leaf concentration of Na, Mg, Ca, Mn, and Zn, and reduced leaf K and plant dry weight. Magnesium fertilization did not affect leaf concentration of Ca, K, Mn, Fe, or Zn. High Ca fertilization increased leaf Ca. At high Mg levels, Ca fertilization had a synergistic influence on Mg uptake. Ca and Mg fertilization did not independently influence plant vigor, chlorosis symptoms, or dry weight production of leaves and stems. As levels of Na fertilization increased, plant vigor and leaf production decreased and chlorosis symptoms increased. With low Na fertilization levels, high Mg fertilization reduced leaf production but with high Na fertilization, plants receiving high Mg levels produced twice the weight of leaves as those with low Mg fertilization. High Mg fertilization reduced the detrimental effects of high Na fertilization on plant growth. This effect may be due to the antagonistic influence of Mg fertilization on Na uptake at high Na fertilization levels.

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