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grown foods for school lunches and for use in restaurants ( Sasaki, 2002 ; Yamamoto et al., 2007 ). The consumption of locally grown foods is also expected to support the development of ecologically sustainable food systems ( Gill, 2006 ). To promote

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on the costs and profitability of organic fruit production. The major goal of this study was to examine consumer preferences for and valuation of organic apples and to assess the market potential for locally grown organic apples. Specifically, a

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Consumer interest in purchasing locally grown and certified organic produce has remained strong. Market data support this, with sales for local food predicted to rise from $4 billion in 2002 to $7 billion by 2011 [ U.S. Department of Agriculture

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The development of industrialized production and global sourcing has changed the marketing structure of the horticulture industry dramatically. The inherent disadvantaged resource base (soils and climate) and high production costs in the northeast United States make it difficult for growers to compete in commodity markets. Exploiting niche and value-added markets are important for the survival of northeast agriculture. Moreover, an emphasis on quality of life has created a movement towards sustainable agriculture. As a result of this movement, many programs have been initiated to promote locally grown products and to support agricultural-based economic development. The common objectives of the “locally grown” programs are to promote agricultural products produced within the region, support the local economy, and develop agricultural markets. Keys to success of a “locally grown” program are a vision, seed funding, a champion, and community, political leadership and technical support. Many innovative regional food and agriculture development programs have been initiated in New York State to support local farmers, revitalize the rural economy, promote local identity and pride, develop agri-tourism, and capture the urban markets. Some examples include the “Finger Lakes Culinary Bounty” initiated by local chefs, “Uncork New York” sponsored by the wine industry, and “Hudson Valley Harvest” and a pilot ethnic market project targeting New York City markets.

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among consumers who may be concerned with different attributes such as local, organic, and other specialty types. A recent survey of 500 Twin Cities consumers showed that consumers buy locally grown produce primarily because of its high quality and

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shop exclusively at one business over another if they know that products are grown locally or in a sustainable manner ( Yue et al., 2009 ). Previous studies have also shown that consumers are interested in ecofriendly products and the use of ecolabels

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containers; and 3) plants grown locally as opposed to being imported. Environmental concerns and consumer preferences. Development of methodologies to measure environmental attitudes dates back to the early 1970s ( Weigel, 1983 ). Relatively recent

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( Bogash et al., 2012 ). Most flowers grown locally are those that do not ship well or have shorter vase lives and are grown on a smaller scale ( Bogash et al., 2012 ). An increase in demand for a wide cultivar of fresh cut flowers has kept the market

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et al., 2002 ). A third emerging niche market is the locally grown produce and plant market. Yue and Tong (2009) reported that consumers in Minnesota were willing to pay similar amounts of money for both organically and locally produced food, and

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with seed-saving practices ensures the continuation of landrace (e.g., a locally adapted crop originating and grown in a specific region) and heirloom (e.g., a generationally preserved crop not bound to a specific locality) crop varieties. Heirloom

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