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Consumption of fruits and vegetables is known to lower the risk of cancer and cardiovascular diseases ( Llorach et al. 2008 ; Nicolle et al. 2004 ). Lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L.) belongs to the Asteraceae family and is one of the numerous

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investigation in relation to drought acclimation of lettuce treated with PGPR in lettuce. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the effects of PGPR on some physiological characteristics, plant growth, yield, and plant nutrient content of lettuce

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Bacterial leaf spot of lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L.), caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians , is an economically important disease of lettuce in the world ( Barak et al., 2001 ; Patterson et al., 1986 ; Pennisi and Pane, 1990 ; Sahin

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consequently, lower net N-delivery potential. The physical status of the algal biomass also influences bioavailability. For example, applying 2 to 3 g of dry algae ( Chlorella vulgaris ) per kg of soil had a better effect on germination and growth of lettuce

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of lettuce continue to increase in the food service industry, including fast food restaurants, the efficient operation of plant factories with artificial lighting are expected to take advantage of their characteristics, which are unaffected by weather

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Lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L.) is one of the top ten most valuable crops in the United States with an average annual value of $2.1 billion ( USDA, 2014 ). There are eight types of lettuce grown in the world, whereas four of them including crisphead

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Verticillium wilt is a destructive disease of lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L.) in the Salinas Valley of California, a region that accounts for 50% of the U.S. lettuce production ( Monterey County Crop Report, 2012 ). The disease is caused by the

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( Shannon, 1997 ). Lettuce is considered to be a relatively salt-sensitive vegetable ( Barassi et al., 2006 ). Salinity has been shown to reduce seed germination, fresh and dry weight of shoot, and root weight of lettuce both by ionic and osmotic effects

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Abstract

A commercially available small garden seeder was modified to improve the precision planting of uncoated lettuce seed. The modified seeder is light weight, is adapted to planting small quantity seed lots, can be rapidly cleaned of remnant seed, and is designed for research and home garden use. Acceptable single seeding of uncoated lettuce seeds in the laboratory averaged 41.5%. Acceptable single seedling emergence in the field averaged 36.8%, a 13.6% improvement in the existing efficiency over the small plot seeder currently used. Minor modifications could make this planter design adaptable to most small-seeded crops.

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. McCreight and Ravindra G. Bhat for their critical review and discussion of the manuscript. This research was supported in part by a grant from the California Lettuce Research Board.

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