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fertigation by drip in commercial production systems. The article also contains updated standards for leaf tissue testing of northern highbush blueberry that were developed from a recent evaluation of nutrients in common cultivars growing in conventional and

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The optimum fertilizer levels of N, P, and K for flower production of field-grown Anthurium andraeanum Andre in Hawaii were determined. Applications were at 0, 224, and 448 kg·ha-1·year-1 with all combinations of each nutrient level. Optimum flower production was achieved at 312N-448P-375K kg·ha-l·year-1. Increased N and K application resulted in a linear increase in flower size. Flower stem length also increased with increasing N, P, and K rates. Maximum flower yield occurred when leaf-tissue levels were 1.87% N, 0.17% P, and 2.07% K. Flower stem length and flower size were at their maximum with leaf N at 1.59% and 1.67% and K at 2.20% and 1.86%, respectively. No relationship was observed between leaf percent P, flower size, or stem length. A range of leaf-tissue levels associated with optimum anthurium flower production was determined for Ca, Mg, B, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, and Mo).

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presentations at field days. The standard index tissue used for pecan is the middle leaflet pair from the middle leaf on current season’s growth ( Fig. 1 ). Typically, ≈100 sun-exposed leaflet pairs are collected from several trees representing a uniform area

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) to either determine nutrient status or target and identify nutritional disorders ( Owen and Whipker, 2020 ). Results of leaf tissue analyses can be compared with known species-specific nutritional leaf tissue sufficiency ranges and standards ( Bryson

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development, the extent of injury, and the rate of recovery. In 2005, the primary author also specifically rated loss of interveinal tissues (1 = no tatters to 5 = all leaves are skeletonized). Herbicides often cause chlorosis, browning, and necrosis of leaf

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found in varying types and amounts across plant tissues can also result in tissue-specific interference. Leaf lamina tissue is commonly sampled in flow cytometry protocols because of its accessibility ( Doležel et al. 2007 ; Pellicer et al. 2021

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, Trade and Consumer Protection (WDATCP), 2003 ]. The first flush of affected white oak leaves in the spring may lose most interveinal tissues, resulting in only the main veins and some residual interveinal tissues (leaf tatters). Leaf tatters can affect a

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. Optimum fertilization requirements ( Biernbaum and Morrison, 2000 ; Scoggins, 2005 ) and nutritional leaf tissue sufficiency ranges and standards ( Biernbaum and Morrison, 2000 ; Bryson and Mills, 2014 ) for the genera Heuchera are limited. Bryson and

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, propagation ( Owen, 2017 ) and plant growth control ( Latimer, 2016 ) studies, respectively. To date, optimum fertilization requirements ( Owen et al., 2013 ; Scoggins, 2005 ) and nutritional leaf tissue sufficiency ranges and standards ( Barnes, 2010

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- and micronutrients based on periodic soil nutrient analysis and annual leaf tissue analysis ( Bolda et al., 2012 ; Bushway et al., 2008 ; Fernandez and Ballington, 1999 ; Hart et al., 2006a , 2006b ; Krewer et al., 1999 ). Primocane leaf nutrient

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