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Abstract

Data from a 3-yr experiment on ‘Ben Lear’ cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait), by multiple stepwise regression at the 1% level, showed that N, P, and K applications increased their respective tissue levels. Tissue Ca and Mn were decreased by N applications in 1969; 1970 tissue Ca was decreased by applications of both N and P. Nitrogen, P, and K applications all tended to decrease 1969 tissue Mg.

Yield was increased by N applications in 1971. A cubic effect of N applications was noted in 1970 anthocyanin and soluble solids contents. Pooled data for 1970 and 1971 were fitted to linear and quadratic equations relating tissue levels to fertilizer applications and yield and quality measurements to tissue levels. Desirable tissue levels of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, and Mn are suggested.

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in leaf N concentration and leaf area-based N content ( Diver et al., 1984 ; Heerema et al., 2009 ; Klein et al., 1991 ), which suggests that growing fruit and seeds can draw on N remobilized from nearby leaves to help meet N demands, especially

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Abstract

Three levels of N, P, and K in all possible combinations were applied to bearing cranberry plots (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait, cv. McFarlin) in the field. Fruit quality (color, size and soluble solids), yield, and plant tissue mineral composition were measured.

Increased tissue N, P, and K resulted from increased applications of the respective elements. These plant nutrients were also significantly correlated with one another. Applied N increased yield, yellowness, lightness, and decreased redness of the fruit. Tissue P was positively associated with fruit yields, yellowness, and lightness, but negatively with fruit redness. The effects of both N and P were modified by K applications.

Tissue mineral levels were generally greater in 1967 than in 1966, except for Mg which decreased and P which did not change.

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competing fruit. However, it is not known whether low-N trees are source-limited in terms of carbon supply. Under low N supply, apple trees generally have less vegetative growth, smaller leaf area, and lower CO 2 assimilation capacity, indicating the carbon

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No. 334-74 A/A; Technicon, Elmsford, NY). From 2002 to 2004, leaf N was determined using the LECO FP-528 (Leco Corporation, St. Joseph, MI) combustion analyzer ( Sweeney and Rexroad, 1987 ). The number and weight of harvested fruit were measured

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Grapevine berries are sinks for the incorporation of both carbohydrates ( Davies and Robinson, 1996 ) and N ( Roubelakis-Angelakis and Kliewer, 1992 ) between veraison and fruit maturity. Restricted TNC availability, induced by limited leaf

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develop, plants were segregated into vine and fruit samples. Additional samples of recently matured leaves were collected for analysis of petiole NO 3 -N and whole leaf total N. Plant tissue was oven-dried at 65 °C and ground for analysis. Total N was

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. Plants were established on 27 Mar. 2002 and left unfertilized after planting (0) or fertilized each spring with 50, 100, or 150 kg·ha −1 of N. Time of natural leaf senescence, manual pruning, and fruit removal indicated in A and fertilizer application

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; Wünsche and Ferguson, 2005 ). N and nonstructural carbohydrates accumulated before leaf fall are of extreme importance for initial growth the next spring, especially so in high fruit-load trees ( Choi et al., 2009 ; Hirata et al., 1974 ; Kim et al., 2009

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average weight of orange fruit between production systems ( Table 2 ). Average weight of orange fruit was significantly higher and similar at both sidedress N rates in both leaf mulch production systems compared with bare soil. Table 2. Effects of four

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