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Danijela Janjanin, Marko Karoglan, Mirjana Herak Ćustić, Marijan Bubola, Mirela Osrečak and Igor Palčić

to be related to previous vine nitrogen supply accumulated in years preceding experiment, rather than foliar fertilization since the C and NPK treatments (as well as DR treatment) obtained slightly higher leaf total N. It can also be a consequence of

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Mary Jane Clark and Youbin Zheng

= 3) for each of eight fertilizer rate treatments, as outlined in Table 1 , were applied to plots evenly by hand in a completely randomized design. Controlled-release N–P–K fertilizer was used as a result of its temperature-influenced nutrient release

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Luther C. Carson, Monica Ozores-Hampton, Kelly T. Morgan and Steven A. Sargent

6 Sept. 2011 and 3 Sept. 2012, tomato ‘BHN726’ transplants at the three- to five-true leaf stage, grown in 128-cell trays (Speedling, Sun City, FL), were planted 51 cm apart on raised beds. The beds measured 76 cm wide and 20 cm high with 1.8 m

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Md. Jahedur Rahman, Haruhisa Inden and Masaaki Kirimura

nutrient solution may result in serious yield reduction. Furthermore, overirrigation and prolonged soil saturation can cause disease in plant roots or root rot. However, different irrigation timing may have an effect on yield by affecting leaf gas exchanges

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Georgina D. Arthur, Adeyemi O. Aremu, Manoj G. Kulkarni and Johannes Van Staden

demonstrated ( Aremu et al., 2012 ). Globally, tomato is recognized as one of the most popular and widely grown vegetable crops. It is easily grown in greenhouses, responds well to the application of fertilizers, and is known to be a heavy consumer of N–P–K

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Nicole Burkhard, Derek Lynch, David Percival and Mehdi Sharifi

control and AS and NW treatments in 2005 (0.412% versus 0.363%) and 2006 (0.408% versus 0.350%), respectively. PN resulted in the lowest leaf tissue K in every trial year (average 0.312%). Table 6. Leaf tissue nutrient (NPK) content (%) at harvest as

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Mary Jane Clark and Youbin Zheng

greater nutrient availability for sedum plants in 5-Sus than 5. Fig. 3. Sedum leaf tissue hue angle relative to color following fertilization with 16N–2.6P–10K POLYON ® Homogenous NPK plus Minors, 5–6 month controlled-release fertilizer [5, 7.5, 10, 15

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Gerry Neilsen, Frank Kappel and Denise Neilsen

because fruit removal and hence yield reduction is permanent regardless of factors that may alter annual fruit set. The yield reductions of ≈10%, as achieved in this study, were apparently insufficient to markedly alter fruit and leaf N–P–K concentrations

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Kathryn M. Santos, Paul R. Fisher, Thomas Yeager, Eric H. Simonne, Hannah S. Carter and William R. Argo

(which averaged 3.2). The S:R ratio continued to be highest at 21 d in the CCC treatment (4.1) compared with an average of 2.4 for the other seven treatments. Constant C fertilizer application increased shoot height and leaf number ( Table 3 ). Plant

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John M. Smagula and Scott Dunham

A commercial lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) field deficient in leaf N and P was used to compare organic and inorganic fertilizers. In a RCB design with eight replications of 12 treatments, experimental plots received 33.6 or 67.2 kg·ha-1 rates of N (urea), P (23% phosphoric acid), N + P (DAP), N + P + K (5-10-5), or N + P + K (fish hydrolysate, 242). Fertilizer containing N alone was as effective in raising N leaf concentrations as those containing N and P. However, leaf P concentrations were raised more by fertilizer providing N and P than only P. Fish hydrolysate fertilizer was as effective as 5-10-5 in raising leaf N, P, and K concentrations in prune and crop year leaf samples. At the 67.2 kg·ha-1 rate, fish hydrolysate, N, NP and NPK increased stem length, N and NP increased flower bud density and fish hydrolysate, N and NPK increased yield compared to the control.