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‘Ruiyang’ is a new late-ripening apple cultivar notable for its high fruit quality and good productivity. ‘Ruiyang’ originated from a controlled cross of ‘Qinguan’ × ‘Fuji’. Similar to ‘Qinguan’, ‘Ruiyang’ has a spreading habit and high resistance

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apricot types and cultivars (μg·g −1 dry matter). With respect to ripening stages, in general, highest vitamin levels (A, E, β-carotene, and lycopene) were determined in early period apricots, whereas the highest vitamin C level was determined in late

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late ripening characteristics. The cultivar is self-compatible and capable of setting full crops without the presence of other cultivars. Besides, it successfully adapts Malatya, the main apricot production area in the world. ‘Eylul’ fruit ripen late

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‘Yuguan’ (Chinese name, which means that its surface is as smooth as jade and its quality is excellent) is a new late-ripening apple cultivar of high quality derived from a cross of ‘Golden Delicious’ × ‘Fuji’. The fruit is cylindrical, and its

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from a natural seedling tree in Shandong Province in 1963. Then, the advanced and regional yield trials for evaluation were carried out from 1975 to 2016. Jianding Youli is a late-ripening cultivar with an optimal ripening date in late September. It has

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population in 1984, and the preliminary, advanced, and regional yield trials for evaluation were carried out from 1985 to 2005. ‘Mipung’ is a late-ripening cultivar with an optimal ripening date in late September. It has good nut quality for eating raw and

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Effect of crop load on dry matter partitioning was studied on 3-year-old peach [(Prunus persica (L.) Batsch (Peach Group)] trees of the early ripening `Early May Crest' (EMC) grafted on `GF677' and Penta (Prunus domestica L.) rootstock and the late ripening `Flaminia' grafted on `GF677' rootstock [(Prunus persica × Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D. A. Webb] and grown outdoors in 230-L containers, for 2 years. Fruit thinning was carried out 10 days after fruit set to produce different crop loads. Trees were sampled destructively throughout two growing seasons and divided into above-ground and root components, for dry matter and carbohydrate analysis. At the end of the fruit development period, in the first year, total tree dry matter accumulation was related linearly to crop load even when the increase in crop load greatly decreased vegetative and root growth. Total dry matter accumulation was highest in EMC/`GF 677' at any specific crop load, and EMC trees on `GF677' allocated relatively more dry matter than EMC/`Penta' trees to vegetative and root growth, even under increasing fruit sink demand. Two consecutive years of heavy crops resulted in an inverse relationship between crop load and dry matter accumulation of trees, due to a major reduction of vegetative, root, and fruit growth. The percentage of dry matter partitioned to fruit decreased with the vigor of the rootstock, and EMC/`Penta' trees had the lowest harvest index at each specific crop load. The early ripening EMC/`GF677' trees which had twice the harvest index of `Flaminia'/`GF677' trees for any level of crop load. `Flaminia'/`GF677' trees had the largest canopy size. Starch content in the roots was lowest for cropping trees and depended on the rootstock and on the length of the fruit development period, being highest for the late ripening `Flaminia'/`GF677' trees. Individual fruit weight decreased with crop load, and the reduction of fruit size was related to rootstock and time of ripening.

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Our objectives were to characterize the quality and maturity changes of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch.] fruit cvs. O'Henry and Nos 21 during maturation and ripening and to identify harvest maturity indices by relating nondestructive and destructive variables. After fruit set, 400 fruit of similar diameter and tree position were tagged to follow maturation and ripening on the tree. During commercial harvest, 48 fruit were ramdomly harvested every 4 to 6 days. Ethylene evolution rate (EER) at 20 °C, fresh weight, and peel ground and cover color (L*, a*, b*, C* and Hue value) were measured to all 48 fruit. Flesh color, firmness at several fruit points, soluble solids (SS), pH, titratable acidity (TA), and SS/TA ratio were measured only to 24 fruit, and the rest were held for up to 7 days at 20 °C as a ripening period to measure the same characteristics previously mentioned. Pearson correlation coefficients were determined between variables to explore possible harvest maturity indices. The most significant changes occurred in EER and ground color (a* value) for both varieties and fresh weight only for cv. O'Henry. For `O'Henry' peaches the highest correlation (P < 0.001) was obtained between EER-suture firmness (r = -0.61). For cv. Nos 21 the highest correlation was between EER-shoulder firmness (r = -0.69). It was also found that fruit softening occurred mainly in the fruit shoulder for both cultivars. Therefore, no harvest maturity indices could be established for these cultivars.

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high and allowed to ripen at 20 °C and 80% RH. Early-harvest pears ripened for 8 d and late harvest for 6 d. On each day during ripening, a series of physicochemical tests were conducted as detailed below. Once the pears were ripe, affective sensory

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locations showed its tolerance to Polystigma and other fungal diseases. Ripening time is early, although later than in ‘Guara’, which allows the succession of harvest. Nut fall before harvest has been very low, but nuts fell easily when shaken. Yield

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