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Results from a 2004 survey involving a nationwide sample of 2004 U.S. adults, age 18 years and older, indicated that consumers spent $28.9 billion on lawn and landscaping-related services in 2002, and $37.9 billion in 2003, representing a 31% growth

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The landscaping design and services industry is the leading economic contributor within the U.S. environmental horticulture industry, with estimated contributions reaching 1.5 million (M) jobs, $221.89 billion (B) in sales revenue, $79.6 B labor

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Recreational activities and aesthetic pleasure motivate US homeowners to purchase landscape products and services ( Ambrose et al. 2020 ; Chalmin-Pui et al. 2021 ). Many homeowners invest significant money and time in improving their gardens

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In discussions among industry representatives, faculty, and graduates of the department of horticulture at Penn State community service was identified as an important attribute of successful landscape contracting companies. To foster a sense of community service responsibility among students, service projects were integrated into three horticulture courses. Fifty-four students in a planting design course worked with township officials to develop a planting plan for a new park located 10 miles from campus. Students planted 120 trees, which were obtained from a nursery operated by the Pennsylvania Dept. of Corrections. Eighty-eight students in two classes, landscape planning and issues in landscape contracting, volunteered to work on a farm being developed as an environmental education center. Work included mechanical and chemical control of invasive species and planting of natives. In discussions following these projects, students expressed personal satisfaction and a willingness to participate in future community service projects.

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Poster Session 47—Ornamental/Landscape and Turf 2 21 July 2005, 12:00–12:45 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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; Hartig et al., 2014 ); the health effects of biodiversity have also been researched recently ( Aerts et al., 2018 ; Sandifer et al., 2015 ). These health effects of natural landscapes have been proposed as a psychological ecosystem service and

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A survey was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Iowa State University (ISU) extension programs and services to the turfgrass, nursery, and landscape plant installation and maintenance industries in Iowa. Completed questionnaires were received from 294 individuals (55% response rate). Respondents indicated they have a continuing need for pest identification and management information and that ISU extension is an important source for this information. In general, most respondents said quality of information provided by ISU extension was better than that offered by horticultural consultants or product suppliers; however, only 48% said extension was doing very well delivering programs and information in a timely manner. Demand for on-site visits with extension specialists was greater than that for distance learning opportunities, suggesting that extension must do a better job of marketing and making relatively new communication technologies palatable.

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Survey data from 788 single-family residences from New England were analyzed to evaluate purchasing preferences and gardening habits. Particular attention was focused on plant attributes and choices of independent garden centers vs. mass merchandisers. Independent garden centers, magazines, and friends were the most important sources of gardening information, while mass merchandisers were relatively unimportant information sources. While consumers trusted information received at independent garden centers, they did not trust mass merchandiser information as much. The most important product and service attributes of retail establishments were well-maintained plants, informative signage, knowledgeable staff, and a wide selection of plant material. Gardening chemicals and fertilizers were purchased at mass merchandisers due to price. Consumers preferred to purchase high-value, long-lived plants (trees and shrubs) at independent garden centers due to higher plant quality and access to knowledgeable staff. When making plant purchases, plant appearance was the most important consideration regardless of whether the plant was an annual, perennial, or woody plant. The presence of flowers on plants was not ranked as influential in making purchase selections, but evidence of new growth, the presence of dark green foliage, and knowledge of a northern-grown source were important. For trees and shrubs, the significance of a plant guarantee and knowledge of a northern-grown source increased in importance in comparison to annuals and perennials.

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positively impact students in this area ( Astin et al., 2000 ). While the service-learning activities did relate well to “real-life” situations that the students would be experiencing in the field of landscape design, they did neither emphasize the area of

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reliable adjustment factor (AF) (King County Department of Development and Environmental Services, 2003; State of California, 1993 ). An urban landscape's water budget, also known as its maximum applied water allowance (MAWA), is calculated by: The

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