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was conducted to evaluate the landscape performance of Ebony crepe myrtle cultivars in north-central Texas (U.S. Department of Agriculture Plant Hardiness Zone 8) under low-input conditions. Materials and methods The study was conducted at three

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. Comparison of sustainable performance ratings totals using the Sustainable Sites Initiative (SSI) scoring system for 16 landscape elements organized in to four area categories: water, planting, gathering, and circulation. The six lines represent the six

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monthly from April to October to determine overall landscape performance, drought stress, blossom number, and percentage of plant covered with blossoms. Overall landscape performance encompassed vigor, foliage quality and color, blossom quantity and

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the three races ( Zlesak et al., 2010 ). Unfortunately, other than Carefree Beauty™, little information is available regarding the use of Buck roses in warmer climates. Identifying roses with strong landscape performance, resistance to pests and

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landscape performance and flowering. Performance at multisite replicated trials. Plants were trialed in three simultaneous field experiments conducted at the North Florida Research and Education Center in Quincy, FL, at the Plant Science Research and

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of site on long-term growth, flowering, vigor, overall quality, and survival—horticultural performance traits that are pertinent to landscape use. Low-input conditions were used because typical garden conditions, in which moisture and nutrients are

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component to produce vinca ( Fain et al., 2008 ). Understanding the survival and landscape performance of plants grown in PTS is important before PTS can be used for landscape bedding plant production. Previous research describing the post

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The nursery and landscape industry is facing the loss of some of its most important landscape shrub crops, such as japanese barberry and winged euonymus, because of their invasive tendencies. Consumer awareness of invasiveness has reduced sales of

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; Haehle, 2004 ; Hostetler et al., 2003 ). Although many taxa are classified as drought resistant, these classifications often are based upon anecdotal observations of plant performance in landscape plantings ( Garcia-Navarro et al., 2004 ; Levitt et al

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.B. 2006 Evaluating north and south Florida landscape performance and fruiting of ten cultivars and a wildtype selection of Nandina domestica , a potentially invasive shrub J. Environ. Hort. 24 137 142 Knox, G.W. Wilson, S.B. 2009 ‘Firepower’ nandina

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