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Since 1996, a number of instructors have greatly contributed to the development of the beginning design sequence in the horticulture and landscape architecture curricula, and deserve recognition. They are E. Anderson, M. Bowe, D. Kessler and

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Landscape design and installation is a fast-growing and profitable segment of the horticulture industry ( Landscape Management, 2003 ). As the landscape profession grows and becomes more sophisticated, the demand for employees who can integrate

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Computer-aided design (CAD) is rapidly becoming an indispensable tool for landscape architects and designers. This has created the need for a simple-to-use, inexpensive, and readily available configuration for introducing computer-aided design on a limited budget to landscape students. This introduction to computer-aided landscape design can be accomplished easily and accurately using the 512K Macintosh computer and the software package MacDraw. Techniques are reported for shading, layering, and customizing plant and groundcover symbols, allowing a personal touch that is lacking in some more-advanced CAD packages. Computer-generated pages can be collaged to make full-sized landscape drawings, which are then copied onto reproduction vellum. In this manner, the design capability is not limited by the size of the minter. This design configuration is currently in use and was used to generate the design and the symbol illustrated.

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Colorado currently has no licensure program for landscaping and many people applying to the Colorado Master Gardener program have indicated a desire to seek entry-level training in order to determine if a second career in horticulture is feasible. Alternatively, some each year who complete this basic training go on into the Green Industry either in basic design and/or maintenance. Colorado State University Cooperative Extension came together with Associated Landscape Contractors of Colorado and the Colorado Nursery Association (now CNGA) to create the Rocky Mountain Landscape Design Guide. The purpose of this publication was to inform the general consumer about the landscape design process. A review will be given using this publication with concurrent laboratory activities to Master Gardeners as a continuing education piece.

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118 ORAL SESSION 29 (Abstr. 242–246) Woody Ornamentals/Landscape: Extension/Education

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Berry College offers a unique environment for learning with 28,000 acres of forests, meadows, lakes, and streams. This distinctly beautiful setting has encouraged environmental awareness among students and faculty on campus. The construction of an academic building to house the School of Math and Natural Sciences in a previously undisturbed, wooded site prompted students and faculty to become interested in the preservation of the site's natural characteristics. Students in the horticulture program worked closely with the Director of Horticulture and the Academic Dean to develop a plan to create a landscape that was both educationally and environmentally sound.

The plan consisted of a detailed landscape design as well as the identification of the steps necessary to implement the design. The design incorporated ornamental plants and geological features native to the southeastern region of the United States with the plant species that existed on the site. The design contains such features as a wildflower meadow, an aquatic garden, rock gardens, and various native trees, shrubs, and groundcovers. Plant materials were properly labeled and brochures are made available to guests, students, and faculty interested in learning more about indigenous geological features and plant materials while touring the building and its landscape. The success of this project is due to the cooperation and participation of faculty, staff, and students and represents a unique learning opportunity.

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Native plant ecosystems, such as meadows and forests, demonstrate how plant communities are physically organized in response to a variety of natural factors and environmental processes. By visiting native ecosystems and diagramming the spatial patterns of naturally evolving plant communities, landscape design students quickly gain confidence about the variety of spaces they can create with plants. In addition, they develop an understanding that the physical organization of plants can have ecological meaning, deeper than simple utility, function, or decoration.

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fundamentals of “ecological landscaping.” Instead, programs in landscape architecture and design have followed a centuries-old tradition of treating plants as tools of creativity: decorations that can be combined with artistic hardscape to create beauty in our

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The Landscape Design Theory class at Oregon State Univ. is composed of undergraduate students from a variety of majors including, horticulture, housing and interior design, business, criminal justice, and art. This diversity of majors means there is a wide range of student knowledge about the history of landscape design and creates a unique teaching opportunity. To capitalize on this diversity and to encourage student participation, concept or knowledge maps were used at the beginning of the term before the material being covered in class lectures. Students were divided into groups of three and asked to develop a group concept map. They were given major societies or events that occurred in history from about 2000 BC (ancient Egypt) through the early 20th century. Additionally each group was given a list of 20 landscape design elements or features. Initially each group developed a historical timeline. After the timeline was complete they linked the different landscape design elements or features with a historical era thereby creating a map of their understanding of landscape design history. After the landscape design history segment of the class was completed the small groups reconvened and evaluated their initial concept map in light of the recently completed lectures. Each group discussed their original map, what associations were correct, and how they would do it differently with their newfound understanding of landscape design history. A class discussion followed regarding initial perceptions and benefits of this learning activity. This teaching strategy could easily be adapted to a number of other horticulture topics.

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Computer assisted plant selection coupled with video disc technology allows students with limited experience in plant identification and selection to successfully complete landscape design plans.

The plant selector and video disc components have been integrated into a C.A.D. program producing a complete work station. Students preparing computer generated designs can refer to both the selector and video disc without leaving the C.A.D. environment. This integration has proven to be an effective teaching tool in landscape design instruction.

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