Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 88 items for :

  • landscape contracting x
Clear All
Author:

To strengthen students' ability to solve landscape problems creatively while working in group settings, faculty members in the landscape contracting program at The Pennsylvania State Univ. incorporated experiential learning through the construction of on-campus landscape projects between 1992 and 1994. Collaborative student groups developed landscape plans and built the projects. Partnering with other university units resulted in benefits essential to completion of the projects. Student evaluations were shared between the instructor and the students. The success of these projects has led to plarming future experiential projects.

Full access

As the landscape design/build industry continues to develop, opportunities for providing baccalaureate degree programs in landscape contracting increase. Employers seek individuals with competencies that are not adequately addressed by traditional horticulture or landscape architecture curricula. The Department of Horticulture at Penn State has developed a Bachelor of Science in Landscape Contracting degree. The program, now entering its fourth year of resident instruction, has experienced rapid growth and a high degree of success. Annual increases in student interest and demand have necessitated caps on the number of students entering the major. An emphasis on design process and on construction technology, and a requirement for successful completion of courses in Horticulture and allied departments contribute to an education which instructs students in the art, science, and management of a professional design/build business. Integration of computer-aided design into Landscape Contracting courses positions graduates to carry current technology to the industry. Students obtain skills on the use of AutoCAD, LandCADD, and New Image software.

Free access

In a survey of 42 recent graduates of the Penn State Department of Horticulture's Landscape Contracting major, 29 respondents indicated their present employment, salary range, and the type of work in which they were involved. 25 were employed by landscape contracting firms, 1 by an irrigation design firm, and 3 were attending graduate school. Salaries ranged from a low of $12,000 to $15,000, to a high of $30,000 to $35,000, with average just below $20,000. 19 were involved in landscape installation, while 14 were doing landscape design and 14 maintenance. Work in pest control and irrigation were each identified by 6 respondents. The survey requested identification of four areas important to their employment that were not adequately addressed in the curriculum. Equipment handling and repair and pest control received the greatest response. Also requested was identification of four aspects of the curriculum that were most useful to them in their employment. Design, plant identification, and construction practices received the greatest responses in this category.

Free access
Authors: and

Poster Session 47—Ornamental/Landscape and Turf 2 21 July 2005, 12:00–12:45 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

Free access

Industry input can assist postsecondary institutions as they strive to provide relevant knowledge and skill-building exercises for the professional development of their students. Using a mail questionnaire, we invited landscape contracting decision-makers to comment on the efficacy of landscape contracting curricula at colleges and universities. The population of Associated Landscape Contractors of America 2003 online member list (2049 companies) was organized into four strata based on company size. A stratified random sample of 400 companies was selected. We received 137 completed questionnaires (35% response rate). Most of the population was either satisfied or extremely satisfied (52%) with college graduates recently hired; only 8.1% of the population was dissatisfied or extremely dissatisfied. When respondents were asked to consider four knowledge categories, a majority (53%) said recent graduates were deficient in business knowledge, followed by construction (25.1%), horticultural (9.6%), and design (5.1%) knowledge. When respondents were asked to rate the importance of topics that could be taught in undergraduate landscape contracting programs, business topics (personnel management, estimating and bidding, and clientele management) were identified as their top three choices. The population also named three business-related skills (client relationships, time management, and managing employees) among the five most important skills for landscape contracting professionals. Despite the stated importance of business knowledge and training, 68.3% of the population said when hiring for an entry-level landscape contracting position, they prefer candidates with strong horticultural skills over those with strong business skills. These results suggest landscape contracting firms would welcome a postsecondary-trained work force with improved business skills; however, this business training should not come at the expense of horticultural course work and experience.

Full access

An undergraduate major in Landscape Contracting was established at The Pennsylvania State University in 1989. Since its inception, women have been consistently underrepresented (13%). From department records and a survey instrument, we examined the academic performance, postgraduate job perceptions, and gender related issues of 319 male and female graduates. Our results showed that women students academically outperformed their male peers in courses specific to the Landscape Contracting curriculum. Survey results indicated that female graduates were represented in all job categories and performed similar types of work as their male peers. In addition, women did not differ significantly from their male peers in regard to job performance and satisfaction levels.

Full access

of all the grower's contracts. Because mass merchandisers are very aggressive in assuring their stores are supplied, this channel was expected to have a positive sign. The signs for garden center and landscaper channels would be less clear. Other

Free access

and conservation, taxonomic studies, plant evaluation, sustainable landscape practices, people-plant interaction, science and natural resources education, and technology transfer work. Providing oversight to outreach activities affecting stakeholders

Full access

In discussions among industry representatives, faculty, and graduates of the department of horticulture at Penn State community service was identified as an important attribute of successful landscape contracting companies. To foster a sense of community service responsibility among students, service projects were integrated into three horticulture courses. Fifty-four students in a planting design course worked with township officials to develop a planting plan for a new park located 10 miles from campus. Students planted 120 trees, which were obtained from a nursery operated by the Pennsylvania Dept. of Corrections. Eighty-eight students in two classes, landscape planning and issues in landscape contracting, volunteered to work on a farm being developed as an environmental education center. Work included mechanical and chemical control of invasive species and planting of natives. In discussions following these projects, students expressed personal satisfaction and a willingness to participate in future community service projects.

Free access

ePortfolios are gaining popularity in academic communities worldwide. Purposes of ePortfolios include: converting student work from paper to digital format, thereby allowing it to be centrally organized, searchable, and transportable throughout their academic lives and careers; promoting student centered learning and reflection; improving advising; and career planning and resume building. Pennsylvania State University is investing in the use of ePortfolios in course work throughout the university system. To facilitate these efforts, the university provides all students and faculty with 500 MB of hosted web space to create and share their portfolios. One of the courses using ePortfolios is Horticulture 120, Computer Applications for Landscape Contracting, in the Landscape Contracting program. Outcomes of implementing ePortfolios include increased availability of student work to potential employers, enhanced recruiting through displays of student work, and enabled reflection on completed work. Students showed improved quality in project work because their projects would be publicly available through the Internet to potential employers, faculty, family, and other students.

Free access