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; Irani et al., 2006 ; Wingenbach et al., 2006 ). Moreover, given high costs often associated with international learning and professional development opportunities, students may lack financial resources necessary to engage in available programs ( Irani

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to complete three credits of International Perspectives, in which the learning outcomes include furthering students’ understanding of cultural diversity and interdependence on a global scale. Immersion in a foreign culture is often an effective way of

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How can HortBase and other electronic information systems benefit horticulturists in developing countries? If Nation-wide distribution of the workload and costs of creation, review, revision, and distribution of individual information files to produce an electronic information system for decision support can be achieved in the U.S., can this collaboration occur world-wide? The European Agricultural Multimedia Network (http://www.stoas.nl/mmnet/), established in 1995, is an international network of more than 37 European institutes and organizations that are active in agricultural education. Its goals are to exchange knowledge and ideas and foster cooperation in development and exchange of agricultural education and extension multimedia products. EUROPEA, created in 1993, is a network of about 500 agricultural colleges and institutes in Europe to optimize transnational cooperation in development of distance education and lifelong learning and to provide an international dimension to students. The international membership of ASHS coupled with global communication technology facilitates global collaboration on information development and access.

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International travel and study courses for undergraduate students can be significant academic learning experiences if there is a well-defined curriculum and high expectations for student performance on homework exercises, class discussions and evaluation instruments. An interdisciplinary perspective serves to broaden students' understanding. “In the English Landscape” is a three-credit, 4-week undergraduate course in-residence, primarily in Corsham, Wiltshire, U.K. Students explore the history of English landscapes and gardens in the context of post-medieval British history. The course is team-taught every other year by Purdue faculty from the Horticulture, History and Landscape Architecture programs. Excursions to landscape, garden and cultural sites provide the primary basis for student discovery. Pretravel readings and lectures prepare students for in-country, site-specific worksheets and class discussions. Course philosophy, content, structure, logistics, and instructional materials, which may be useful as a basis for course development by educators at other institutions, are presented.

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A course entitled “Plantation, Beverage, and Tropical Nut Crops” was developed in order to expand the content and diversity of the horticulture curriculum at Louisiana State University. The course was designed for both upper division undergraduates and graduate students in the plant sciences. The course was intended to broaden the exposure of both domestic and international students to the world's most important plantation, beverage, and tropical nut crops. These crops are generally not commercially grown in the United States, but include some of the world's most economically significant commodities. The selected crops are typically not covered in existing horticulture or agronomy classes. Details of the individual crop cultural practices, harvesting methods, postharvest care, agro-processing, and international marketing are provided. The instructional materials were formatted for delivery via compressed video and transmitted to off-campus sites to afford the opportunity of long-distance learning to nontraditional students. The course was successful in attracting nonhorticulture students and facilitated interdisciplinary interaction among students from diverse curricula.

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? Jossey-Bass San Francisco, CA Furco, A. 2007 Institutionalising service-learning in higher education 65 82 McIlrath L. MacLabhrainn Iain Higher education and civic-engagement: International perspectives and community engagement Ashgate Burlington, VT Gall

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Through a CyberServe Grant, a WWW Home Page and student/community listserve were established as core communication tools for a special study taught Spring 1997, Hort 4984, Horticulture and the Community: Professional Growth through Volunteering. It incorporated the Blacksburg Electronic Village to easily put student volunteers and the community programs they worked with in direct contact with each other, allowing an exchange of ideas that made them equal partners in their endeavors. It provided direct access to valuable information to understand the principles and philosophy behind programming efforts for both students and community sites where they volunteered. It also was a recruiting tool to involve other students and the Horticulture Club in service-learning projects because students in the class could post “help” notices to entice classmates to participate in defined projects. It provided students with knowledge and experience in the role of the Internet in enhancing the quality of life in their communities. Information installed on the site included reading materials on Horticultural Therapy, children's gardening, community gardening, science education through gardening, and volunteering in these areas; community site descriptions and slides, program activities, goals of program participants, and materials from the program (i.e., selected first-grade drawings of their garden); students participating in the class and information about them; goals, objectives, and management information on the course; and links to relevant information from around the world to put the activities of the students in an international framework.

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Chat rooms and their use in everyday life are becoming increasingly common, and the technology may be a useful tool to link students with experts of a given subject material and each other. In our shared course Plant Nutrition and Nutrient Management, we experimented with using a chat room to link students with experts in the field of plant nutrition. Our main goal was to enhance the learning experience of the students by providing them with access to national and international plant nutrition researchers. Web CT was used to create and conduct the chat rooms and a chat etiquette evolved to prevent crosstalk and control the flow of the discussions. Positive outcomes of the chat room use included exposure of students to the technology and beneficial interaction between students and experts. Negative aspects of chat room use included the time involved to coordinate the overall effort and train experts to use the technology; the slow pace of some chats; effective grading; and the superficial coverage of some topics. We are developing modifications for future sessions to allow subjects to be explored in more depth and to improve networking between students and experts.

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144 POSTER SESSION (Abstr. 504–507) International Horticulture

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develop the students’ teamwork and interpersonal skills.” Literature cited Barkley, A.P. 2003 Learning the economics of international trade by teaching it to others: a class project on globalization North Amer. Colleges Teachers Agr. J. 47 25 31 Bull, N

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