Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 158 items for :

Clear All
Author:

viability would enhance the learning experience of undergraduates. The objective of this paper is to describe an inquiry activity that included a major hands-on activity focused on the concept of pollen viability in an undergraduate horticulture course

Full access
Author:

Abstract

These are days of questioning, of legitimizing, of considering alternatives, of adjustment. The signs of inquiry and concern about priorities are everywhere as our colleagues talk about a Rip Van Winkle Society and as environmentalists parade as experts on everything from horticultural crops to sociology.

Open Access

Electronic information systems provide efficient information management—development, updating, storage, retrieval, and delivery. No more stockpiling of printed, going-out-of-date information when specific, concise, up-to-date information can be obtained just in time from the Internet. Authoring for electronic media is different than authoring for the printed page. To use unique characteristics of electronic information systems, information is presented in chunks, small units of information that can combine text, video, or sound to present one concept or to answer one question. A chunk may be linked to other chunks to provide definitions and further elaboration of terms or ideas. A chunk may be linked to related chunks to provide comprehensive information inquiry-driven by and tailored to the inquirer's interests and understanding. A chunk may be linked to other chunks to provide definitions and further elaboration of terms or ideas. Collaboration is facilitated by the World Wide Web (Web). Shared development reduces redundant efforts and costs and results in better products than can be produced by autonomous efforts. Continual, shared development and updating keep the individual chunks and the linked chunks (URLs) up-to-date and dynamic. Educators can thread (link) selected web modules or chunks (URLs) together into dynamic study assignments or dynamic textbooks for courses of study. To obtain the best of both media, CD-ROM software can be designed to interact with a Web site. The ways that CD-ROM and online are interacting are varied and evolving. Graphics-rich databases such as color photographs of plants or pests and related text that do not require continual updating are well suited to CD-ROM. Web links from the CD-ROM to additional, dynamic information and updates at the Web site keep the CD-ROM live and current. ASHS members are uniquely qualified to generate continually updated, peer-reviewed horticultural information on the web for continuous access by the interested learner whose pathway on the web will be inquiry-driven.

Full access

The principles of plant physiology are best learned in an environment where students are directly engaged in the process of scientific inquiry. Working from this assumption, we have developed a two-stage approach to laboratory instruction that fosters student-directed research within an undergraduate plant physiology course. During the first 10 weeks of a 16-week semester, students develop competency in measuring physiological variables by using an array of standard analytical techniques. A core set of 10 laboratory experiments provides structured instruction and teaches the principles of modern physiological analyses. During week 11, students observe a demonstration of a plant response, where the underlying cause of the phenomenon is not evident. Working together in groups of three or four, students hypothesize on the physiological mechanisms that may be involved. After submitting a statement of hypothesis and a plan of study, each group then requests the necessary instrumentation, plant material and greenhouse and/or growth chamber space to conduct their experiments. Results of their experimentation are presented during week 15 in both written and oral formats. The approach appears to help students to integrate and connect learnings from earlier in the semester to solve a defined problem. Further, students learn how to judge the reliability of experimental results and to evaluate whether conclusions drawn are justified by the data.

Full access

Garden Explorations, a continuing program at the South Carolina Botanical Garden (SCBG), Clemson University, promotes science participation among children, families, undergraduates, and teachers. Integrated by themes of Plants and their Partners, Plants and their Environment, and Web of Life, Garden Explorations programs include Summer Science Camps, Family Science Saturdays, and Family and Community Outreach Programs. In these programs, college students (largely education, horticulture, biology, and recreation majors) have the opportunity to learn about and experience natural science and math in the garden, along with elementary school teachers, parents, and upper-elementary age children. These inquiry-based learning opportunities enhance and expand the education and professional preparation of Clemson University students who participate in the program. By involving students in intensive hands-on, inquiry-oriented life science and math activities during Garden Explorations programs, we seek to increase science literacy in our region.

Full access

EMG projects indicate that programmatic emphasis was on providing a response to an individual’s inquiry at EMG clinics at major shopping centers, libraries, public gardening events, and county fairs ( Warner, 1978 ). Responding to individual inquiry is

Free access

plants and animals to shift from animistic thinking that does not distinguish between living things and inanimate objects ( Leddon et al., 2009 ; Piaget, 1929 ). To develop appropriate cognitive development during childhood, inquiries into life and the

Free access

Information storage technologies are changing, so this project is focused on the future and the use of new videodisc technology. A model plant science inquiry-learning tool was developed for vocational agriculture students using advanced video and computer technology. The interactive videodisc lesson, which focuses on plant identification, was designed to increase learning and allow teachers to spend more time with students.

Free access

Abstract

The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard Univ. continues to serve as International Registration Authority for cultivar names in 11 genera of ornamental woody plants, and the following notes pertain to cultivar names that have been registered at the Arboretum since the last list was prepared (1). The 11 genera include Chaenomeles, Cornus, Forsythia, Gleditsia, Lantana, Malus (ornamental species), Philadelphus, Pieris, Ulmus, and Weigela. Inquiries concerning the registration of cultivar names in these genera should continue to be addressed to S.A. Spongberg, The Arnold Arboretum, The Arborway, Jamiaca Plain, MA 02130

Open Access