Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 39 items for :

  • hospital plant environments x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All
Free access

Seong-Hyun Park and Richard H. Mattson

hospital environments. Patients were further asked about their willingness to return to their room during any future hospitalization. Ninety-three percent of patients in the plant group responded positively, whereas 70% of patients in the control group

Full access

Seong-Hyun Park and Richard H. Mattson

%) were highly favored for the control group. Regarding negative qualities of hospital room, patients in the control and plant groups had similar negative comments concerning toilet facilities, insufficient space, and the hospital environments. Patients

Full access

Tove Fjeld

Plants are widely used in building environments; however, studies reporting the health and discomfort symptoms of people in response to indoor foliage plants are few. The objective of the presented studies was to assess the effect of foliage plants or a combination of foliage plants and full-spectrum fluorescent lamps on self-reported health and discomfort complaints in three different work environments: an office building, an X-ray department in a Norwegian hospital, and a junior high school. Health and discomfort symptoms were found to be 21% to 25% lower during the period when subjects had plants or plants and full-spectrum lighting present compared to a period without plants. Neuropsychological symptoms, such as fatigue and headache, and mucous membrane symptoms, such as dry and hoarse throat, seemed to be more affected by the treatments than skin symptoms, such as itching skin.

Full access

Aino-Maija Evers, Leena Lindén, and Erja Rappe

Approaches using human issues in horticulture (HIH) offer new possibilities to develop nearby nature in cities, especially during a period of rapid urbanization in Finland. New initiatives have been developed in school gardening, environmental education, gardening in training programs for disabled people, therapeutic environments in hospitals and institutions, and in the University of Helsinki horticultural education and research programs. At the University of Helsinki, two contact teaching courses and national seminars were organized in 1996 and 1998. Initial studies in the HIH approach have three main themes: 1) gardening as a tool for better quality of life in homes for the elderly, 2) ecology, native plants and extensive maintenance in parks, and 3) the use of horticulture in environment and science education at the lower level of the comprehensive school.

Full access

Hye Ran Kwack and Paula Diane Relf

As the level of urbanization has increased, many people in Korea have begun to recognize the beneficial effects of plants in our immediate surroundings and involvement in horticultural activities. Today, an increasing number of Koreans attempt to improve the quality of life and enhance educational effectiveness through horticultural activities. Kindergarten, elementary, middle, and high schools have initiated garden-based programs. Some universities include courses focusing on horticulture applications to human well-being in their regular graduate programs or in their social education curricula. A few general hospitals, psychiatric hospitals, and rehabilitation centers have begun applying horticulture as a means of treatment. Most of the research articles in Korea on various aspects of human issues in horticulture have been published since the foundation of two academic societies, the Korean Horticultural Therapy Association and the Korean Society for Plants, People, and Environment. These articles are primarily focused on the areas of school gardening, healing gardens, and psychological or physiological effects of horticultural activities. For the future development of human issues in horticulture in Korea, several areas need to be enhanced including: interdisciplinary studies of horticulture and social education; development of different skills, techniques,and scales to validate the effects of horticultural therapy, healing gardens, and gardening as a teaching tool in public education; and an organization empowered to certify horticultural therapists.

Free access

Ruth Kjærsti Raanaas, Grete Grindal Patil, and Terry Hartig

patients who it appears stayed mainly in a single hospital room. It should also be emphasized that the center and the environment at Røros include a variety of options for restoration from stress and that the plant intervention is relatively modest

Free access

Andrea Dravigne, Tina Marie Waliczek, R.D. Lineberger, and J.M. Zajicek

workplace environments influence psychological and physiological factors of employees, specifically job satisfaction, and that people benefit from interactions with plants and nature ( Bringslimark et al., 2007 ; Goodrich, 1986 ). The benefits of plants

Free access

Jane Dyrhauge Thomsen, Hans K.H. Sønderstrup-Andersen, and Renate Müller

. 1976 Flowering plants as a therapeutic environmental agent in a psychiatric hospital HortScience 11 365 366 Thomsen, J.D. Müller, R. 2010 Plants for a better life—People–plant relationships in indoor work environments Acta Hort. 881 837 841 Willig, C

Open access

Namiko Yamori, Yoriko Matsushima, and Wataru Yamori

surgery patients ( Diette et al., 2003 ; Lohr and Pearson-Mims, 2000 ; Park et al., 2004 ; Park and Mattson, 2009 ; Ulrich, 1984 , 1992 ). Therefore, blooming or green plants as well as colorful fresh cut flowers in a hospital environment could be a

Open access

Hui He, Yanwei Yu, Jiamin Li, Luyun Hu, and Fan Zhou

life, and reduced life satisfaction ( Cai and Li, 2011 ). Meanwhile, patients are prone to psychological and social disorders ( Wu et al., 2016 ). In addition, some patients experience chronic schizophrenia in psychiatric hospitals in China and require