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The population of senior citizens in our society (65 and older) are growing at a faster rate than any other segment of the population. Loss of decisionmaking capabilities coupled with controlled retirement home environments can lead to stress and depression in our elderly. At the same time, our nations youth no longer enjoy a family nucleus that includes elders who help guide youth away from risky activities. The publication “HILT: Horticulture Intergenerational Learning as Therapy” (Cornell Media Services, Ithaca, N.Y., in press) was used as a guidebook for combining senior citizens and gradeschoolers at three local settings in 1995 and 1996. The project encourages elders to take charge and mentor youth while leading youth in an indoor and outdoor gardening program. The pilot projects included a public gradeschool site, a mental day-care facility, and a local retirement home. Youth benefited by learning about their elders and about horticulture. The subject of horticulture provides a comfortable and valuable learning environment as well as a focal point for the participants. The project provides three evaluation methods that include survey, interview, and leader observation tools. In our study, senior participation increased by 75% during two 8-week projects and 40% during a 7-month project. Surveys reveal that senior citizens were nervous and concerned about behavior of young people before the project, yet renewed and excited about future projects after participation. Youth enjoyed hearing stories, learning about planting, and getting dirty. Use of self concept and morale scales will be presented. A copy of the project publication as well as ideas about using the publication will be provided in the discussion.

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This article focuses on designing and building a major exhibit at the Bella Italia-themed 2009 Philadelphia Flower Show, which took place on Mar. 1st through 8th, 2009. Hosted by the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society (PHS), the annual event is the

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We want to thank the crop nutrition and management team at HRDC, synAgri, Yara, the staff at the L'Acadie experimental farm, Stéphanie Jacquet, the agronomists who specialized in horticulture at MAPAQ and Production clubs.

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Abstract

Color slides put more life into all forms of horticultural teaching, in the classroom, for industry and agricultural meetings, as a part of garden club programs, also on television, the largest audience of all. The ASHS Slide Collection is under way. Help develop it! Make use of it! The Education Committee suggests that a good slide set with narrative should be given the same administrative credit as any other form of publication.

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Strong academic abilities and practical work experience are important to employers of horticulture graduates. In greatest demand are students with competent personal and leadership abilities and technical skills. Increased class size and increased university core curriculum requirements hinder our capacity to develop these added skills within our curriculum. However, through extracurricular offerings we can offer students ways to develop skills that are not fully expressed in the academic arena. Student interaction in the traditional horticulture club requires practicing interpersonal relation and often conflict resolution skills. Students learn to work as a team to accomplish goals that they have set for themselves as a group. The Associate¥ Landscape Contractors of America (ALCA) Student Career Days experience offers a highly effective means for reinforcing cognitive skills gained in the classroom and laboratory, as well as supplementing academic learning opportunities with technical activities beyond those offered in the curriculum.

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Poster Session 29—Teaching Horticulture to Diverse Constituencies 20 July 2005, 12:00–12:45 p.m. Poster Hall–Ballroom E/F

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Through a CyberServe Grant, a WWW Home Page and student/community listserve were established as core communication tools for a special study taught Spring 1997, Hort 4984, Horticulture and the Community: Professional Growth through Volunteering. It incorporated the Blacksburg Electronic Village to easily put student volunteers and the community programs they worked with in direct contact with each other, allowing an exchange of ideas that made them equal partners in their endeavors. It provided direct access to valuable information to understand the principles and philosophy behind programming efforts for both students and community sites where they volunteered. It also was a recruiting tool to involve other students and the Horticulture Club in service-learning projects because students in the class could post “help” notices to entice classmates to participate in defined projects. It provided students with knowledge and experience in the role of the Internet in enhancing the quality of life in their communities. Information installed on the site included reading materials on Horticultural Therapy, children's gardening, community gardening, science education through gardening, and volunteering in these areas; community site descriptions and slides, program activities, goals of program participants, and materials from the program (i.e., selected first-grade drawings of their garden); students participating in the class and information about them; goals, objectives, and management information on the course; and links to relevant information from around the world to put the activities of the students in an international framework.

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Consumer interest and market surveys play an important role in determining what consumer wants and needs are from an industry. These surveys can also serve the role of preparing students for their future jobs in the industry. The horticulture industry is no different. Companies need to know what consumer interests and needs are so they can serve them better. Likewise, students need to know what areas of horticulture are receiving the highest demand by consumers so they can prepare themselves better. A consumer preference study was conducted at the Topeka, Kan., “Lawn, Garden, and Flower Show” by members of the Kansas State Univ. Horticulture Club. The objectives of the survey were to determine: 1) the specific gardening interests of the respondents, 2) the demand for educational materials on specific gardening areas by the respondents, 3) what the respondents' garden buying habits were, and 4) what the respondents' plant selection preferences were. Survey respondents indicated that, when selecting plant material, plant quality was the most important criterion used, while plant packaging was of least importance. Plant size and price were only given some importance in the plant selection decision. Other results of the survey will be presented.

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Horticulture requires knowledge, acquired skills, and practical experience. Knowledge and acquired skills are relatively easy to impart in the university setting; however, weekly laboratory sessions fall far short of providing students with the practical experience they need in the workplace. Internship programs provide students opportunities to reinforce the knowledge and skills they have acquired in the classroom and allow them to gain new experiences, techniques and ideas. At Texas Tech Univ., students are highly encouraged to take an internship after both their 2nd and 3rd years. During an average academic year, about 30% of horticulture students participate in an internship, while more than 50% complete an internship during their degree program. Arrangements are generally made to ensure the students will rotate through a wide variety of horticultural experiences. At the conclusion of their program, interns write a report summarizing their experiences and then give a short oral presentation to other students at a club meeting or in a class. These presentations peak the interest of the other students and serve to keep the program effective.

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Auburn Univ.'s shade tree evaluation is an ongoing study comparing a moderately diverse range of species, varieties and cultivars of larger-growing trees. Initiated in 1980, there were 250 tree selections planted in three replications located at the Piedmont Substation near Camp Hill, Ala. Among the published “fruits” of the evaluation have been critical comparisons of 10 Acer rubrum selections with respect to growth and fall color characteristics; growth rate and aesthetic characteristics of fourteen Quercus selections; growth and fireblight susceptibility of 10 Pyrus calleryana selections; and the best performing trees overall in the first 12 years of the study. The shade tree evaluation has served as an important precedent for initiation of six additional landscape tree tests in Alabama. Besides its benefits as a research project, the shade tree evaluation has provided a living laboratory for a wide range of educational audiences including landscape and nursery professionals, county extension agents, urban foresters, Master Gardeners, garden club members, and horticulture students. Knowledge gained from the shade tree evaluation has also been shared through presentations at many meetings and conferences.

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