Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 999 items for :

  • horticultural education x
Clear All

stimulate thought regarding potential future university collaboration. The article is based on a workshop presentation made at the 2011 ASHS annual meeting in Hawaii ( Davis and Hariyadi, 2011 ). GENERAL HORTICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EDUCATION NEEDS

Free access

all ages, education levels, income levels, marital statuses, household sizes, genders, and regional locations. Consumer horticulture stakeholders also include Extension Master Gardener (EMG) volunteers. There were ≈95,000 active volunteers in the

Free access

Abstract

Through horticultural education, we aspire to develop men and women with ability to make wise, independent decisions based upon facts, clear reasoning, and understanding. Many levels of education undoubtedly will be expanded because of need, change, interest, and publicity. Early vocational training in gardening evolved through apprenticeships of gardeners and landscapes. Later, formal horticultural courses at all educational levels have been incorporated into school curricula. Through this system, horticulturists were exposed to an intensive educational experience in a short time.

Open Access
Author:

Abstract

By necessity and design, horticulture's place in society is changing. As the society itself changes, each part of the whole is subjected to pressures, from within and without, to find ways to adapt itself to better meet the changing needs of the society and of its people. One of these needs is the difficulty many people have in coping with the “rush and scramble of life.” Horticultural therapy is helping people solve this difficulty. Horticultural therapy itself is not new, but its professional status is. The program now available at Kansas State University for training students in this field is the first in the nation. The following paper is adapted from a presentation “The Therapeutic Value of Horticulture,” as a part of the education symposium “Modern Methods of Horticultural Teaching,” at Kansas State University, Tuesday, August 3, 1972, during the 68th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Horticultural Science.

Open Access

Most college professors spend little time helping youth (kindergarten to 12th grade) learn about horticulture, and the elementary and secondary schools seem to have created a dividing line between scientific concepts and practical life-long skills. Biology classes continue to emphasize the chemical processes of photosynthesis and deemphasize the nurturing, caring, dependability, responsibility, sense of accomplishment, and other life-long skills that can be obtained from growing plants. However, retail garden centers and chain stores are increasingly offering books and supplies on gardening and related activities for children. Seed companies market and package seeds just for children. Botanical gardens and arboretums are including youth horticultural activities as part of their on-going educational programs. The involvement of university educators in horticultural youth education can assist the “trickle up” theory to the parents of children along with affecting future voters. Take the first step to see what classroom horticultural materials are available in your state. Currently many teachers have an interest in learning more about horticulture but need educational materials. In addition, there is a large number of volunteers interested in this endeavor. Do your part and help develop accurate horticultural materials for these instructors to use in formal and informal educational settings.

Free access

Oral Session 32—Horticulture Curriculum and Instruction, Instruction Methods Moderator: Michael A. Arnold 21 July 2005, 10:00–11:45 a.m. Room 107

Free access

134 ORAL SESSION 37 (Abstr. 296–301) Cross-commodity: Education

Free access

Abstract

Three hundred and one Extension professionals (88.3% response), working in home horticulture educational programs in the United States in 1984, indicated their greatest areas of inservice education needs in program delivery are: 1) increasing expertise in the various subject matter areas, 2) developing skills in plant disorder diagnosis, 3) managing information files for rapid retrieval and dissemination, and 4) developing and implementing innovative programs. Subject matter areas where respondents have the greatest training need are: 1) pest identification and control, 2) diagnosis of plant disorders, 3) weed identification, 4) home fruit production, 5) information on recommended cultivars, and 6) ornamental plant identification. Home vegetable gardening ranked 1st in respondent perception of importance and perception of proficiency needed for job performance.

Open Access

Alliance, 2016 ). The purposes of this article are to briefly review the current status of agricultural higher education and horticultural production in Myanmar, and to outline future opportunities for horticultural research and education. The article is

Free access