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, transplanting, and caring for the plant in its entirety had perceived benefits. Successfully growing plants from seed offers several benefits to home gardeners, including lower costs, greater variety of cultivar availability, and greater satisfaction from more

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The University of Hawaii at Manoa campus offers a rich diversity of plants for students, university personnel, and the public. Although providing botanical facts, a current university web site and an arboretum brochure about campus plants lack horticulturally related information. By highlighting the unique horticultural plants on campus, a web site would provide valuable information on the uses, care, and propagation of these plants. The purpose of this project was to develop a web site featuring horticulturally important plants on campus. The home page explains why plants are beneficial in interior spaces. Other sections of the web site include basic plant care, plant selection, plant names, and plant pictures. Basic plant care covers planting media, containers, watering, lighting, fertilizing, pruning, propagation, and pest control. Users can select plants using two criteria—lighting in the plant's desired location (low, medium, and high) and low plant maintenance. Information on a specific plant is accessed by common name, scientific name, or a plant's picture. Each plant's web page provides details on its background, care, and propagation. By emphasizing the important horticultural plants on campus, this web site helps students, university personnel, and the public select and grow plants for their dormitories, apartments, offices, and homes. In addition, users gain knowledge about the lush landscape environment on campus. Lastly, the web site enhances the learning experience of students in horticulture and botany courses, serves as a resource for K–12 students for their visits to the campus to learn about tropical plants, and aids tourists in planning a more informative visit to campus to see the plants they learned about on the web site.

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An educational attempt to assist Gila River Indian Community members to return to a sustainable small-farm heritage has shown initial success after 1 year. The project uses horticultural technology to help tribal members overcome severe social concerns. The first phase addressed the needs of youth at risk through a 10-acre farm at the Gila River Indian Community Juvenile Rehabilitation and Detention Center in Sacaton, Ariz. During 1993, the farm operation leveled 10 acres of squash, corn, and watermelons; planted and cared for 200 deciduous fruit and citrus trees; and planted and cared for 150 commercial Christmas trees. Produce was either sold to community members or donated to community food centers at the schools or at homes for the elderly. The youth were led by 14 volunteers who completed an intensive training program and were certified as Master Gardeners by the Univ. of Arizona. They have donated -300 hours of time to the project. The project gave youth at risk an opportunity to learn new concepts and skills, gain exercise, and work off detention time. As tribal leadership observed the initial successes, they gave permission to address health and nutrition as well as other youth-at-risk targets within the community beginning in 1994.

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Attendees at the 2001 Philadelphia Flower Show participated in an interactive-quiz-formatted survey on touch-screen computers to determine their knowledge and use of plant health care (PHC) and integrated pest management (IPM) practices. Participants answered 15 questions in three categories: 1) PHC practices (criteria for proper plant selection, correct planting practices, and reasons for mulching and pruning); 2) IPM practices (insect identification, plant and pest monitoring, and maintenance of records on pests found and treatments applied to their landscape plants); and 3) demographic and sociographic questions to aid in characterizing the survey population. Over half of the participants (58%) were interested in gardening and a majority (77%) were interested in protecting the environment. Most participants (66%) were between 36 and 60 years of age with a mean age of 47 years, 76% lived in and owned a single-family home, and greater than half (56%) had never purchased professional landscape services. Most recognized PHC criteria for proper site selection, although not all environmental site characteristics were recognized as being equally important. Nearly half (49%) identified the correct planting practice among the choices offered; while an equal number of participants chose among the several improper practices listed. Although reasons for mulching were properly identified by the respondents, excess mulching around trees was considered a proper planting practice by over 39% of the participants. When questioned about IPM practices, a majority reported that they identify pests prior to treating them (71%) and that they scouted their landscapes (82%). However, only 21% kept records of the pests that they had found and the treatments that they applied for those pests. Participants' responses were further examined using cluster analysis in order to characterize the participants and identify meaningful consumer knowledge segments for targeting future extension programming. Three distinct segments were identified: 1) horticulturally savvy (69% of the participants), 2) part-time gardener (25% of the participants), and 3) horticulturally challenged (6%). At least 47% of the horticulturally savvy and part-time gardeners correctly answered plant health care questions (44% of the total survey participants). These two segments included more individuals who were interested in gardening and protecting the environment and are potential targets for future PHC and IPM extension education programs. In contrast the horticulturally challenged recorded no interest in or opinion on gardening or protecting the environment. It is apparent that a majority of consumers are learning and employing PHC and IPM concepts. Proper site selection, planting practices, and mulching along with record keep- ing and pest identification proficiency remain key educational areas to be developed. Although not all gardeners are well versed in all subject matter, a basic knowledge of PHC and IPM is being demonstrated.

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The population of senior citizens in our society (65 and older) are growing at a faster rate than any other segment of the population. Loss of decisionmaking capabilities coupled with controlled retirement home environments can lead to stress and depression in our elderly. At the same time, our nations youth no longer enjoy a family nucleus that includes elders who help guide youth away from risky activities. The publication “HILT: Horticulture Intergenerational Learning as Therapy” (Cornell Media Services, Ithaca, N.Y., in press) was used as a guidebook for combining senior citizens and gradeschoolers at three local settings in 1995 and 1996. The project encourages elders to take charge and mentor youth while leading youth in an indoor and outdoor gardening program. The pilot projects included a public gradeschool site, a mental day-care facility, and a local retirement home. Youth benefited by learning about their elders and about horticulture. The subject of horticulture provides a comfortable and valuable learning environment as well as a focal point for the participants. The project provides three evaluation methods that include survey, interview, and leader observation tools. In our study, senior participation increased by 75% during two 8-week projects and 40% during a 7-month project. Surveys reveal that senior citizens were nervous and concerned about behavior of young people before the project, yet renewed and excited about future projects after participation. Youth enjoyed hearing stories, learning about planting, and getting dirty. Use of self concept and morale scales will be presented. A copy of the project publication as well as ideas about using the publication will be provided in the discussion.

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facilities. However, there is some data on the positive impact of personal responsibility with animal care in prisons and plant care in nursing homes. For instance, if they have had responsibility for animals while in prison, most inmates do not re

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-GBR personnel received a grant to supply child care providers with materials to construct gardens at child care development centers and at the homes of in-home child care providers. Because the nature of the grant was horticulture based, VOA-GBR collaborated

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, age, and lot size. Owners of more expensive and newer homes were more likely to water frequently and routinely, feel it important to have green lawns, and sweep grass clippings and lawn-care products off impervious surfaces. A small percentage of

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EMG 2022). Texas EMGs receive training comprising a minimum of 50 h of education regarding a variety of topics, including plant growth and development, soils, integrated pest management, fruit and vegetable production, and lawn care. After training

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information included all of the information from the little information care tag and provided a picture of each plant and detailed pruning, deadheading, and factual information for individual plants in the container garden ( Mason, 2007 ). Thus, the design was

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