Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,278 items for :

  • heat stress x
Clear All

Heat stress is one of the major limiting factors for cool-season perennial grasses in many regions. As a consequence of climate change and global warming, heat stress may have increasingly negative impact on crop growth and persistence. Plants have

Free access

decline, including heat stress (HT) and drought stress (DS). Because this species is often found in nature growing in wetland habitats and areas that do not have high summer temperatures ( Davy, 1980 ; Hagerup, 1939 ), tufted hairgrass may be sensitive to

Free access

proteins ( Richmond and Lang, 1957 ; Selivankina et al., 2001 ). Heat stress has also been reported to accelerate the process of protein degradation ( Gulen and Eris, 2004 ; He et al., 2005 ; Jiang and Huang, 2002 ). Under conditions of high temperature

Free access

tolerance between warm-season and cool-season plant species ( DiPaola and Beard, 1992 ; Fry and Huang, 2004 ). Nutrient deficiency under heat stress has been observed in various cool-season turfgrass species, which may largely contribute to growth

Free access
Free access

researched. Heat stress often decreases the uptake of nutrients in plant tissues or decreases the total content of nutrients in the plants, although effects can vary among nutrients and species ( Giri et al., 2017 ). Hungria and Kaschuk (2014) reported that

Free access

). Drought stress is another major limiting factor for turfgrass growth, particularly during the summer months. The decline in TQ of fine fescues, which is commonly observed during the summer, is typically associated with heat, drought, or both and is

Free access

overall turf quality of cool-season grasses during summer months is commonly referred to as summer stress. Summer stress can be broken down into two major components, heat stress and drought stress ( Huang et al., 1998a ; Jiang and Huang, 2000 , 2001b

Free access

heat stress, has been described as an important limiting factor of turfgrass growth ( DaCosta and Huang 2013 ). The first changes in plants occur at the cellular level and include altered protein and biochemical syntheses, altered metabolism, and

Open Access