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Steve M. Spangler, Dennis D. Calvin, Joe Russo and Jay Schlegel

damage at harvest in sweet corn varies somewhat predictably according to harvest date. Ferro and Fletcher-Howell (1985) found a bimodal pattern of infestation levels, with plots harvested before 1 Aug. having moderate european corn borer infestations

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Ji Hee Kim, Jeung Keun Suh, Seong-Tak Yoon, Pablo Jourdan and Mark S. Roh

reported for castor beans ( Carvalho et al., 2010 ). Delay in harvest date to 10 Oct. (Frame G) resulted in only four empty seeds and one semifull seed while the remaining 69% of the seeds were full seeds. The relationship between the weights of seeds, the

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Julie R. Kikkert, Stephen Reiners and Beth K. Gugino

range of 73 to 107 d, but was significantly less at 57 d. The yield of larger roots was significantly higher as harvest date increased. There was also a significant interaction of harvest date and row spacing. Hipp (1977) reported differences in the

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Robert F. Heyduck, Steven J. Guldan and Ivette Guzmán

. (2011) sowed spinach in high tunnels in September and were able to harvest four times: November, December, January, and February. In our high tunnel study, we examined the effect of fall sowing date (Study A) and staggered harvests of October

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Katharine B. Perry and Todd C. Wehner

A heat unit model developed in a previous study was compared to the standard method (average number of days to harvest) for ability to predict harvest date in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). Processing and fresh-market cucumbers were evaluated in 3 years (1984 through 1986), three seasons (spring, summer, and fall), and three North Carolina locations. The model predicted harvest date significantly better than the standard method for processing, but not for fresh-market cucumbers.

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Katharine B. Perry and Todd C. Wehner

The use of a previously developed model for predicting harvest date in cucumber production systems is described. In previous research we developed a new method using daily maximum temperatures in heat units to predict cucumber harvest dates. This method sums, from planting to harvest, the daily maximum minus a base temperature of 60F (15.5 C), but if the maximum is >90F (32C) it is replaced by 90F minus the difference between the maximum and 90F. This method was more accurate than counting days to harvest in predicting cucumber harvest in North Carolina, even when harvest was predicted using 5 years of experience for a particular location and planting date.

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Arthur Villordon, Christopher Clark, Don Ferrin and Don LaBonte

Optimum scheduling of the sweetpotato harvest date is essential in obtaining maximum yield of the economically important US#1 yield grade. Unlike other horticultural produce, sweetpotato storage roots will continue to gain size and weight if

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Allan F. Brown, Elizabeth H. Jeffery and John A. Juvik

:3 families were segregating for maturity, multiple harvests were done whenever three or more individuals from each family were ready for harvest. Each plot was harvested at least twice. Harvest date was computed using the formula [μ(h ij /n ij )]/N

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Imed Dami, Said Ennahli and David Scurlock

study to investigate the influence of crop level and harvest date on yield components, fruit composition, and bud cold-hardiness in ‘Vidal blanc’ grapevines grown in northern Ohio. Materials and Methods ‘Vidal blanc’ grapevines were planted in 1981 at a

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George E. Boyhan, Albert C. Purvis, William C. Hurst, Reid L. Torrance and J. Thad Paulk

This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of harvest date on yield and storage of short-day onions in controlled-atmosphere (CA) storage conditions. In general, harvest yields increased with later harvest dates. Yields of jumbo (>7.6 cm) onions primarily showed a quadratic or cubic response to harvest date, first increasing and then showing diminished or reduced marginal yields. Medium (>5.1 to ≤7.6 cm) onions generally showed diminished yield with later harvests as jumbos increased. Neither days from transplanting to harvest nor calculated degree days were reliable at predicting harvest date for a particular cultivar. Cultivars (early, midseason, and late maturing) performed consistently within their harvest class compared to other cultivars for a specific year, but could not be used to accurately predict a specific number of days to harvest over all years. Only three of the eight statistical assessments of percent marketable onions after CA storage were significant with two showing a linear increase with later harvest date and one showing a cubic trend, first increasing, then decreasing, and finally increasing again based on harvest date.