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Open access

C. E. Gambrell Jr., E. T. Sims Jr., G. E. Stembridge, and W. H. Rhodes

Abstract

SADH, applied as postbloom sprays to 9 peach cultivars in a series of experiments from 1964 to 1969, accelerated maturation and reduced the number of pickings required for most cultivars. Although SADH did not affect the number of fruits per tree, yield, or fruit size, it advanced the maturity date of ‘Ranger’ as much as a week; that of ‘Blake’ 4 days. ‘Cardinal’, an early cultivar, was not noticeably affected by SADH applied at different stages of development. SADH caused fruit to abscise more readily from the stem and left less fruit remaining on the trees when harvested mechanically. SADH had no detrimental influence on ‘Redglobe’ peaches stored at 50°F for 3 weeks. These effects support the feasibility of using SADH as an aid in mechanically harvesting freestone peaches intended for fresh market.

Free access

Raquel González-Herranz, Kimberley A. Cathline, Matthew W. Fidelibus, and Jacqueline K. Burns

., 2008 ). One mechanized production method is dry-on-vine (DOV). In the DOV method, canes bearing mature fruits are severed, causing them to dry into raisins on the trellised vines, from which they are mechanically harvested ( Fidelibus et al., 2008

Open access

A. Pendergrass, F. M. Isenberg, L. E. St. John Jr., and Donald J. Lisk

Abstract

Onion foliage sprayed before harvest with a neo-decanoic acid mixture (Wiltz-65) became bleached and limp. The rate of water loss from bulb necks was accelerated. Residue analysis shows that at concentrations sufficient to wilt tops, about 1 ppm is recoverable from bulbs before storage, none after 4 months’ storage. Neck rot was increased in 2 cultivars which form double bulbs but not in one where bulbs grow singly.

Open access

S. C. Phatak, M. E. Austin, and J. S. Mason

Abstract

(2-Chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon) was applied at 0, 570, 1000 and 2000 ppm to muscadine grapes (Vitis rotundifolia Mich. cv. Hunt), 1, 2, or 3 days before once-over harvest. All ethephon treatments increased berry abscission and reduced skin tear due to harvest when berries were harvested 2 days or 3 days after spraying. Delaying harvest to 3 days after treatment with 2000 ppm ethephon increased berry abscission to 46% and reduced skin tear to 9% in 1977. In 1978, 2000 ppm of ethephon increased berry abscission to 29% and reduced skin rupture to 29%. Taste panels could not detect flavor difference from the ethephon treatments.

Open access

George C. Martin

Abstract

Spray application of 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid (ethephon) to walnut trees caused dehiscence of hulls and enabled complete nut removal with a single mechanical shaking operation as much as 3 weeks earlier than normal. Walnuts were hullable and the quality was generally superior to that of the controls. In some instances considerable leaf fall resulted from the treatment.

Open access

Larry A. Stein, George Ray McEachern, and J. Benton Storey

Abstract

Ethephon was trunk injected into the transpiration stream of pecan trees 10 to 21 days before shuck split in an attempt to expedite shuck opening in 1983. Ethephon concentrations were based on the estimated amount of water flowing through the tree per day. At College Station and Hondo, Texas, a 10 ppm injection significantly increased shuck opening. Leaf drop was only 35% at 10 ppm compared to much higher leaf drop in previous research. There was no difference in number of nuts set and the extent of limb dieback between the control trees and those trunk injected with 10 ppm ethephon. At Ft. Stockton and Midkiff, Texas, injections of 10, 20, and 40 ppm increased nut opening and early leaf drop, but reduced fruit set in the following year (1984). There was no limb dieback at these locations. Injections of trees in El Paso failed to cause shuck opening.

Open access

G. S. Howell Jr., B. G. Stergios, S. S. Stackhouse, H. C. Bittenbender, and C. L. Burton

Abstract

Application of (2-chloroethyl)phosphonic acid (ethephon) reduced fruit removal force (FRF) as much as 50% depending on concentration and time of application. Reduction in FRF allowed reduced mechanical harvesting vibration frequency which reduced damage to berries during harvest and thus increased shelf-life. Mechanical harvest was further facilitated by ethephon-induced color development and hastening of abscission which reduced the number of machine harvests required.

Open access

Mohamed I. El-Tamzini, Mohamed S. Shaladan, and Zaegham M. Niazi

Abstract

Folicote (FC) antitranspirant at 2.5 or 5% alone had no effect on olive fruit removal force (FRF) and fruit drop of olive (olea europeal L.). Alsol at 2000 and 3000 ppm decreased FRF by 47 and 57%, and resulted in 55 and 66% fruit drop, respectively, when sprayed alone. However, when FC was mixed with alsol, significantly lower FRF and higher fruit drop resulted. Mixtures of 3000 ppm alsol plus 2.5% FC had effects similar to those of 2000 ppm alsol plus 5% FC. Mixing FC with alsol increased the effectiveness of alsol under relatively unfavorable weather conditions, compared to alsol alone.

Free access

Martinez T. Miguel and Duarte U. Miguel

Ethephon and NAA in 2 combinations were applied to 17 year old “Western” pecan trees near the coast of Hermosillo, in Sonora, Mexico. The treatments were: a) 300 ppm NAA plus 800 ppm Ethephon; b) 300 ppm NAA plus 500 ppm Ethephon. These treatments were applied at three different times: first, when nut physiological maturity was reached, second, 10 days after nut physiological maturity and third, 21 days after physiological maturity was reached. The best treatment was the combination of 300 ppm NAA plus 800 ppm Ethephon applied 10 days after physiological maturity. This treatment resulted in 100% shuck dehiscence, 10% leaf abscission, 2 weeks advance in harvest and the best kernel color when compared to control.

Full access

R. Karina Gallardo, Eric T. Stafne, Lisa Wasko DeVetter, Qi Zhang, Charlie Li, Fumiomi Takeda, Jeffrey Williamson, Wei Qiang Yang, William O. Cline, Randy Beaudry, and Renee Allen

. The objective was to create a baseline for establishing future directions in research and extension activities related to the use of mechanical harvesters in the blueberry industry. This effort is part of a larger project, “Scale Neutral Harvest Aid