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historical, cultural, and environmental themes representing the scope, vision, and mission of LA/Hort. Taking inspiration from Italian gardening and farming traditions, our exhibit embodied three critical aspects of LA/Hort: a long tradition of hands-on

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number of fruit removed during hand-thinning treatment)]. Branches are fitted with the hand-thinning gauge 3 cm (1.2 inches) from the trunk. The objectives of this experiment were to evaluate a hand-thinning gauge on multiple apple cultivars trained to

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research has shown that hands-on activities can have widely different impacts on student learning ( Holstermann et al., 2010 ) and satisfaction ( Henderson et al., 2018 ). Thus, to ensure educational quality, it is important to evaluate hands-on activities

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greenhouse insects and diseases from living specimens, or being able to practice water and media sample testing. In response, our team developed a hands-on workshop model for educational sessions that we termed Integrated Pest Management In-Depth. The

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terms and scientific principles used in gardening. Hands-On Horticulture is taught in a 4-h block, once per week on Friday afternoon. This time frame enables students to learn about a horticultural concept and then immediately implement the concept in an

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practical experience and hands-on learning to effective agricultural pedagogy. University of California—Davis used the Delphi survey technique to determine, from a subset of agricultural academics at that institution, the type of activities that should be

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first-hand experience on how to apply a concept for themselves. The concept of pollen viability is a critical component in the field of plant breeding and can be used to explain various phenomena of plant breeding as they relate to pollen quality. Pollen

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Many people, including growers and gardeners, fail to carefully read pesticide labels before each use because they assume they know what the label contains. The UF Miami-Dade County Extension pesticide trainer developed several hands-on exercises where participants had to find information on labels chosen for specific features. The first group was people taking the Core/General Standards training. Five pesticide labels were used. Participants were asked to find information from three different categories: 1) basic information used for record keeping and about the product;2) Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and Precautionary Statements; and 3) additional product information such as irrigation and tank mix warnings. A second group, Private Applicators (growers and their employees), studied 6 labels (1 overlap with Core training). They were asked information that focused on Worker Protection Standard issues, resistance management, limits on number total amount applied, and pre-harvest intervals. For both types of licensed applicator training, participants were divided into groups of 5 to 6. On several occasions, growers and other licensed applicators said they thought labels should have greater uniformity regarding location of key information. Master Gardeners (MGs), the third group, were first given three general publications on labels and 1 on protecting the applicator. They then received labels of four homeowner products and were guided through finding information such as: labeled crops/sites, pests controlled, signal words, mixing instructions, preharvest intervals and replant information. MG knowledge was evaluated with a five-question quiz. All participants commented that they learned a lot about reading labels.

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In an effort to improve higher education, most states now require non-graded assessment of students enrolled in publicly funded universities. Assessment may be across the curriculum or within a major at graduation, yearly, or during individual courses or lectures. I have used two assessment techniques in my classroom that are effective and require a minimum of time. These techniques encourage student participation in class and allow for non-graded anonymous assessment in a manner that the students take very seriously. During the first class of the term students are handed filing cards and given 5 minutes to write their course objectives. By comparing their objectives with mine, I am able to react to student interests and needs in a constructive manner. At the end of one out of three lectures per week, students are given 1-2 minutes to write the “muddiest point” of the day's lecture. This enables the instructor to determine which points need further clarification. Discussion will focus on these techniques and their implications for learning horticulture at both the graduate and undergraduate levels.

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The first four chapters of a hands-on gardening curriculum (Junior Master Gardener Handbook Level One) were introduced into three East Baton Rouge Parish (Louisiana) elementary schools in the fall semester of 2002 as an informal education program conducted by East Baton Rouge Parish Master Gardener volunteers and Louisiana State University students. The curriculum took place once per week for 2 hours during regular school hours. Science achievement tests, developed at Texas A&M University specifically for the Junior Master Gardener program, were given before and after the students participated in the gardening activities to determine whether or not the activities helped improve achievement scores. Science achievement was significantly different (P ≤ 0.0167) between the experimental classes' pretest and posttest scores, while no significant difference was found between the pretest and posttest scores of the control classes. No significant difference was found between the experimental and control classes due to treatment. Several variables may have affected the outcome of the study, but the results show once weekly use of gardening activities and hands-on classroom activities help improve science achievement test scores.

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