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Common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important economic crop in the United States and globally ( Uebersax et al. 2023 ). Most beans in the genus are commercially classified into three groups ( Chaurasia 2020 ): snap beans, green beans, or

Open Access

Abstract

‘Oregon Trail’ combines ‘Blue Lake’ flavor, color, and texture in a large pod borne on a bush plant. It differs from other bush green bean cultivars (1–5) recently released by Oregon State University in its longer pod and slightly less concentrated bearing habit. ‘Oregon Trail’ is recommended primarily for home gardens but may be useful also for processing or fresh market where large sieve pods are acceptable.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Oregon 91’ is a bush green bean developed for commercial processing in western Oregon. It results from 22 years of breeding to develop bush bean cultivars with pod characteristics of ‘Blue Lake’ pole bean and an acceptable growth habit. ‘Oregon 91’ should complement or partially replace ‘Oregon 1604’, a bush green bean of ‘Blue Lake’ type which has been important to Oregon processors because of its earliness and dependable production. Compared to ‘Oregon 1604’, ‘Oregon 91’ is slightly later in maturity and slightly less productive, but has a better growth habit and straighter pods. It should be most useful to processors who need pods of smaller diameter than those of ‘Orergon 1604’.

Open Access

‘Oregon 83’ is a bush green bean developed for commercial processing in western Oregon, where beans of the ‘Blue Lake’ type, either bush or pole, have been important for about 50 years. ‘Oregon 83’ is generally ‘Blue Lake’ in foliage and pod characteristics (Fig. 1). It may supplement or partially replace ‘Oregon 1604’, a high yielding cultivar from the Oregon State University breeding program. Compared to ‘Oregon 1604’, ‘Oregon 83’ is slightly later, has a shorter, straighter pod, and better growth habit. The medium-length, generally straighter pods should facilitate more efficient processing.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Oregon 17’ is an early maturing bush green bean of ‘Blue Lake’ pod type. Its use may permit an earlier beginning of operations by Oregon processors. ‘Oregon 17’ is about two days earlier than ‘Oregon 1604’, a standard cultivar for commercial canners in western Oregon. ‘Oregon 17’ should yield less than ‘Oregon 1604.’ However, this deficiency may be offset by greater processing efficiency of ‘Oregon 17’ pods, which are smoother and straighter than those of ‘Oregon 1604’.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Oregon 43’, is a bush green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) of ‘Blue Lake’ type, developed for processing in western Oregon. ‘Oregon 43’ will usually equal or exceed the yield of ‘Oregon 1604’, a currently important cultivar, at smaller sieve sizes. It thus may give more favorable grades and higher return to the grower, but, pod wall fiber can develop by the sieve-6 stage of maturity, requiring careful management by processors. General quality of ‘Oregon 43’ has been acceptable for canning and freezing when it is harvested within a normal commercial maturity range. It may be of most value where a large percentage of sieve-4 pods are needed.

Open Access

Green or common beans ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are harvested at a physiologically immature stage of development. Growth is rapid at the time of harvest and beans exhibit comparatively high respiration rates, even when held at low temperatures

Free access

., 2018 ). This gene is used in combination with p such that most pc snap beans also lack flavonoids. Snap beans with pc are considered desirable because the trait imparts a very uniform, dark-green pod color. Other pleiotropic effects of pc

Open Access

Color (chlorosis) of eight dry bean cultivars was measured using a Chlorophyll Meter at 5 sites over 2 years in western Nebraska to determine color differences due to cultivars, site, year and iron treatments. There were significance differences between cultivars for color at all sites. However, cultivars were not consistent in color response to iron treatments across all sites. `Spinel' and `Othello' were classified as having darker green foliage while `Steuben Yellow Eye' and `Redkloud' were classified as having lighter green foliage. Correlations between foliage color and yield were greater on sites with higher pH. Selections can be made for bean lines which consistently have darker green foliage color. However, they are not always the highest yielding lines.

Free access

Vegetable production in the Caborca area is about 6500 ha, and the main crops are asparagus, muskmelon, watermelon, and pea. However during 1999, some growers tested green snap beans as a new crop for this area. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate five green snap beans with round podded (`Benchmark', `Landmark', `Jade', `Probe', and `Prosperity') and two densities (14 and 28 seeds/m) on subsurface drip irrigation system. The sowing was on beds of 2.0 m with two rows separated 60 cm. The date sowing was on 7 Sept. 1999. The first cutting were between 65 and 70 days after sowing in all varieties; in this case `Benchmark' was the earliest. The cumulative yield were 330, 140, 87, 63, and 20 boxes/ha (30 lb/box), respectively, in four harvests. On the other hand, the high population yielded 14.4% more than the low population. All varieties were damaged by frost that ocurred on 22 and 23 Nov. `Prosperity' was more susceptible to mosaic virus and `Benchmark' more tolerant. The pod quality distributions were 19.9%, 21.5%, 26.1%, and 21.0% for classes 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. We have not seen any important insect pests during this trial.

Free access