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Michael W. Smith and William D. Goff

Patch budding is a common propagation technique for pecan (Carya illinoinensis) commonly used in the central and western United States, but seldom used in the southeastern United States. Success rates vary, but 75% is normally an acceptable survival rate. Selected budwood and rootstock treatments were evaluated to improve budding success. Additional studies were conducted to evaluate bud forcing techniques that would leave the rootstock intact, allowing a second bud to be inserted if the first patch bud failed. Girdling exceptionally vigorous shoots at the base used for budwood improved success, but neither tip pruning shoots used for budwood or rootstock affected patch bud survival. Patch budding was more successful using budwood from 1-year-old branches than from current season shoots, a finding that greatly extends the window available for propagation using patch buds. The age of rootstock wood at the budding site did not affect patch bud survival. Girdling the rootstock immediately above the dormant patch bud was less effective than top removal for forcing the patch bud in the spring. Application of a lanolin paste of 0% to 5% 2,3,5-triodobenzoic acid (TIBA) or 0.02% 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) to a girdle immediately above the patch bud was positively related to the percentage of patch buds forcing when tree tops were left intact. The combination of girdling, 5% TIBA, and 0.02% BAP resulted in 76% of the buds forcing compared with 73% forced using top removal. This approach damages trees less and enables a second chance for patch budding on a stronger tree.

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Tommy E. Thompson and L.J. Grauke

= protandrous cultivars; Type II = protogynous cultivars. Availability ‘Apalachee’ was released 23 Feb. 2009 and is not patented. Graftwood was supplied to nurserymen in the spring of 2009. The USDA does not have any trees for distribution. This

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Tommy E. Thompson and L.J. Grauke

fruit scab resistance of ‘Lipan’ with other cultivars. Availability ‘Lipan’ was released on 22 July 2011. As stated, ‘Lipan’ is not patented and can be grafted and budded as much as desired by anyone. Graftwood will be supplied to nurserymen in late

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Tommy E. Thompson, L.J. Grauke, and William Reid

pecan clones growing near Chetopa, KS, using the Hunter-Roberts scale ( Hunter and Roberts, 1978 ). z Availability Graftwood was supplied to nurserymen in the spring of 2007. The USDA does not have any trees for distribution. This

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Tommy E. Thompson and L.J. Grauke

budded as much as desired by anyone. Graftwood was supplied to nurserymen in the spring of 2009. The USDA does not have any trees for distribution. Genetic material of this release will be deposited in the National Plant Germplasm System where it will be

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Xinwang Wang, Keith Kubenka, Warren Chatwin, Tommy Thompson, and L.J. Grauke

trees for distribution. Graftwood is currently being grown and will be distributed to licensees in January 2023. Parties interested in licensing ‘Pueblo’ can visit https://www.ars.usda.gov/ott/licenses-section-folder/licensing-process/ for more

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Júlia Halász, Andrzej Pedryc, Sezai Ercisli, Kadir Ugurtan Yilmaz, and Attila Hegedűs

exist to document the admission of Turkish graft-wood and other propagation materials to Hungary ( Faust et al., 1998 ). Even the Hungarian word used for this fruit crop, “kajszi,” has a Turkish origin as “kaysi,” meaning superior, sweet-seeded, and

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L.J. Grauke, Bruce W. Wood, and Marvin K. Harris

phenotypic and biochemical identification are underway (J. Randall and K. Ong, personal communication). International distribution of graftwood has been curtailed by this disease. Phytosanitary inspection protocols call for seasonal inspections, with