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Marco A. Palma, Yu-Jen Chen, Charles Hall, David Bessler, and David Leatham

and consumer preferences for orchid attributes. Several independent garden centers in Hawaii who are also orchid growers were interested in gaining insights into consumer attitudes and preferences for orchids and orchid attributes in the Hawaiian

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M.L. Stratton

Growing Hardy Orchids . Philip Seaton, Phillip Cribb, Margaret Ramsey, and John Haggar. 2011. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey. Distributed by University of Chicago Press, 1427 E. 60th Street Chicago, IL. 128 pages. $23.00 Paperback

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Chairani Siregar

Singapore Vermeulen, J.J. 1991 Orchids of Borneo Vol. 2 Bulbophyllum. Bentham-Moxon Trust, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew Surrey, UK Wood, J.J. 1997 Orchids of Borneo Vol. 3 The Sabah Society Kota Kinabalu

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Richard A. Criley

The New Encyclopedia of Orchids . Isobel la Croix. 2008. Timber Press, 133 S.W. Second Avenue, Suite 450, Portland, OR 97204-3527 www.timberpress.com . 524 pp. List price $59.95. Hardback. ISBN 978-0-88192-876-1. Can there be any family of

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Michael Compton and Timothy Zauche

Lady slipper orchids have great potential as a perennial bedding plant in temperate-zone climates Unfortunately, many gardeners fear these species because of their high cost and perceived difficulties associated with growing plants outdoors. The former factor can be addressed by improving the production of plants at the wholesale level. Growers contest that sphagnum peat and coconut coir are poor organic addenda for these species due to their natural acidity. Anaerobic digestion-derived biosolids (ADB) are not acidic like sphagnum peat or coconut coir, and may be the perfect organic addendum for the culture of ladyslipper orchids. Hence, 3-year-old plants of showy (Cypripedium reginae) and yellow ladyslipper (Cypripedium parviflorum var. pubescens) orchids were grown in soilless potting mixes containing vermiculite and perlite plus various concentrations and combinations of ADB and coconut coir. Plants were grown in the greenhouse at 70 ± 10 °F and received normal light and photoperiod during Summer 2005. Growth, as assessed by the dry weight of dormant stem tissue, of showy ladyslipper potted in media containing ADB was three- to four-times greater than those grown in media containing coconut coir. Growth was similar among yellow ladyslippers grown in media containing ADB or coconut coir due to the fact that these plants had produced all their stem growth for the season before the experiment was initiated. ADB has great potential as an organic addendum to horticultural growing media used for the culture of Cypripedium species. Use of anaerobic digester-derived biosolids in horticultural growing media is a protected intellectual property and available for license through the WiSys Technology Foundation.

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Mark A. Hubbard

College of the Ozarks is a private, liberal arts college in southwestern Missouri, and the Agriculture Dept. has recently begun instituting a variety of horticulture courses in an effort to meet the increasing student interest in horticultural science. The objective is to educate and train students in the horticulture fundamentals and specific production areas (advanced courses). Also, the College is in the process of constructing teaching and demonstration gardens to be used in conjunction with classroom instruction. These gardens will include a plant materials collection and horticultural crop production areas. Additionally, as the College requires that students work part-time at any of several work “stations” on campus, students have the opportunity to gain experience in landscaping or in production greenhouses on campus. Currently, the college has 10,000 ft2 of greenhouse space that is operated for the purposes of producing plants for campus landscaping, maintaining a ≥6000 orchid collection, and producing plants for seasonal sales. The college intends to integrate the classroom instruction, experiences in the teaching gardens, and the required work experiences to provide students with a complete horticultural education. Comments and suggestions for this budding endeavor are highly sought after.

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M.L. Stratton

cultivated hybrids rather than collected species. Phillip Cribb is an orchid taxonomist and conservationist from Kew Gardens and has written other good books such as Growing Hardy Orchids and the Guide to the Flowers of Western China. Werner Frosch has

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Kaylee A. South, Paul A. Thomas, Marc W. van Iersel, Cindy Young, and Michelle L. Jones

the University of Georgia, Athens, GA. The orchids were transported on a temperature-controlled truck from Green Circle Growers (Oberlin, OH). Plants were growing in a custom bark media (95% bark and 5% sphagnum peatmoss; Oldcastle Lawn and Garden

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David L. Hensley

, hybridizing and naming a new orchid after his mother. He was a frequent contributing author to Arkansas Gardener magazine. Jon is survived by his father, Eugene, of State College; a sister, Karen Kimball, of Espoo, Finland; a brother, Mark, of Memphis, TN

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Boris Andrés Bran Barrientos and Jong-Yi Fang

attractive purple, pink, white, and yellow medium- to large-sized flowers, which make them worthy subjects for cultivation. The most widely cultivated species of the genus is Spathoglottis plicata , commonly known as the garden orchid or ground orchid. Due