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herbicide, followed weeks later by cultivation and debris removal ( Frances et al. 2010 ). Wildflowers are often propagated by seed, so use of preemergence herbicides at seeding can reduce establishment and decrease stand density. The use of postemergence

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Botanic gardens increasingly work to advance conservation ( Oldfield, 2010 , among others), and like zoos, many gardens have adopted conservation as one of their primary missions. Conservation horticulture is an area of work that leverages staff

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was a low root:shoot ratio compared with controls ( Table 3 ). However, this result appeared to have no effect on shoot size and quality in the greenhouse and had no impact on establishment and growth of plants transplanted into the garden, where

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For more information about the activities, publications, and membership benefits, contact Master Gardeners International, P.O. Box 526, Falls Church VA 22040-0526; telephone 703.241.3769; fax 703.241.8625; e-mail mgic@capaccess.org .

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University of Georgia released PP-1, or “Cowboy” ( Hanna et al. 2018 ). Consumers of horticultural products represented nearly half of the $42.3 billion (USD) US nursery and garden revenue in 2021. Other contributing groups include farmers, retailers, and

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orchids in vitro in greenhouse, nursery, or garden conditions that include information on inoculation with an orchid mycorrhizal fungus as part of the propagation process. Research has demonstrated the importance of orchid mycorrhizal fungi ( Rasmussen and

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Abstract

The Botanical Garden was conceived in 1968 when Dr. Fred C. Davison, President, charged a committee composed of faculty from the plant sciences “to study and present a final proposal for the establishment of a ‘Living Plant Library’ at the University of Georgia.” The epithet, Living Plant Library, was used in preference to botanical garden or arboretum which evoked memories of the original botanical garden at the University that existed from 1832 to about 1855; and/or the Arboretum started on South Campus about 1908 by Dr. T.H. McHatton, Head of Horticulture. Both gardens were extinguished by the path of progress – campus construction.

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The objective of this project is to estimate establishment and operating costs for garden centers at two levels of sales and to specify the general set of financial, marketing and business principles that should be available to the owner/manager of a garden center.

After surveying 25 garden centers across the United States, two models were derived. A large garden center with annual sales of $1,000,000 is described. A smaller garden center with annual sales of $350,000 is described. Capital budgets, including investment and operations costs for each firm have been developed.

Each firm is evaluated based on standard business indicators. A merchandising program composed of layout, pricing, advertising, cost structure and diversification is outlined.

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Oral Session 14—Consumer Horticulture and Master Gardeners Moderator: Cynthia Haynes 19 July 2005, 10:00–11:15 a.m. Room 108

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An important element of the social horticulture program at the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension has been the creation of school gardens to enhance educational efforts for children in Las Vegas. Since 2002, a variety of methods has been employed to train teachers and administrators in using gardens, and this has resulted in establishment of successful gardening programs. Southern Nevada has experienced a 400% population increase in 25 years. Results of surveys of area stakeholders between 2000 and 2002, Clark County elementary school staff in 2001, and Clark County school principals in 2004, indicate a desire to incorporate gardens in schools, but concerns about establishing and maintaining them persist. Furthermore, apprehension about trying to garden under challenging climatic conditions characteristic of the Mojave Desert is expressed frequently, as is hesitation about using gardens to enhance the school curriculum in at-risk schools. When offered training in use of gardens, however, a majority of principals surveyed responded positively. They also expressed interest in tracking the educational and social impacts of gardens on students and faculty. This article reports on results of community stakeholder meetings and surveys of Clark County schools, as well as the methods that are being used to create a school gardens program in the most rapidly growing metropolis in the United States.

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