Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 115 items for :

  • fusarium crown rot x
Clear All
Authors: and

Abstract

Resistance to Fusarium crown and root rot (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici) in the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) was inherited as a monogenic dominant gene in a cross between the breeding lines 89-1 (resistant) and 1239A (susceptible).

Open Access

Media and nutrient variables were investigated to develop methods of reducing the incidence and severity of fusarium crown rot incited by Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht. f. sp. radicis-lycopersici Jarvis & Shoemaker (FORL), a disease problem of current importance with tomato Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. Root-dip inoculated seedlings were transplanted into trays of a 1 Canadian peat: 1 vermiculite medium that had been prepared with factorial combinations of CaCO, (0.75 or 3.0 kg·m), Ca(NO) or (NH) SO (each at 225 mg N/liter), and NaCl at 0 or 2000 mg Na/liter as the experimental treatments. Crown rot was more severe with the lower CaCO rate, with (NH) SO, and supplemental NaCI. Data on fresh weight of seedlings expressed as percentage values relative to the noninoculated controls supported observations on disease severity.

Free access

Fusarium crown and stem rot, caused by Fusarium avenaceum, is a serious disease of lisianthus, Eustoma grandiflorum Raf. (Shinn.). While more than 80 new cultivars of lisianthus have been released for sale in the United States in the past decade, there is a lack of information on their susceptibility to this pathogen. Forty-six cultivars of lisianthus were evaluated for resistance to F. avenaceum. Cultivars were grouped according to blue/purple, pink, or white colors and evaluated within their color class. Although all cultivars evaluated were susceptible to F. avenaceum, partial resistance was observed as indicated by differences in the length of time to symptom expression and in the frequency of diseased plants. `Ventura Deep Blue' and `Hallelujah Purple' (25%) in the blue group, `Bridal Pink' (23%) in the pink group, and `Heidi Pure White' (53%) in the white group had the lowest frequency of diseased plants at 55 days after inoculation. In 21 of the 46 cultivars, 80% to 100% of the plants expressed symptoms at 55 days after inoculation. Screening cultivars for resistance to F. avenaceum is the first step to breeding and developing resistant cultivars. These results also can be useful to growers who could select cultivars that express some level of resistance as an aid in management of this disease until more resistant cultivars are released.

Free access

Fusarium crown and stem rot, caused by Fusarium avenaceum (Fr.: Fr.) Sacc., is a serious disease of lisianthus [Eustoma grandiflorum Raf. (Shinn.)]. While more than 80 new cultivars of lisianthus have been released for sale in the United States in the last decade, there is a lack of information on their susceptibility to this pathogen. Forty-six cultivars of lisianthus were evaluated for their response to infection by F. avenaceum. Cultivars were grouped according to blue/purple, pink, or white flower colors and evaluated within their color class. Although some plants of all cultivars were susceptible to F. avenaceum, partial resistance was observed as indicated by differences in the length of time to symptom expression and in the frequency of diseased plants within each color group. In 21 of the 46 cultivars, 80 to 100% of the plants expressed symptoms within 55 days after inoculation. The lowest frequencies of diseased plants 55 days after inoculation were found in `Ventura Deep Blue' and `Hallelujah Purple' (25%), `Bridal Pink' (23%), and `Heidi Pure White' (53%) for the blue/purple, pink, and white flower color groups, respectively. Screening cultivars for resistance to F. avenaceum is the first step in breeding resistant cultivars. The methods we developed for these studies should be useful in screening for resistance. These results also may help growers select cultivars that are less susceptible to F. avenaceum, which should aid in the management of this disease.

Full access
Authors: and

Host nutritional variables were evaluated for their effects on the severity of crown and root rot of tomato caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis-lycopersici. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seedlings (cv. Bonnie Best) were grown in a pathogen-infested, soilless rockwool system in the greenhouse and were fertilized with a nutrient solution that was amended with macro- and microelements at various rates. Disease was evaluated after 2 weeks using an index of 0 to 4, and plant fresh weight was measured. Regression analysis indicated that disease severity was significantly increased by ammonium-nitrogen [NH4Cl, (NH4)6Mo7O24, and (NH4)2SO4], NaH2PO4·H2O, Fe-EDDHA, MnSO4, MoO3, and ZnSO4·7H2O. Disease severity was reduced by nitrate-nitrogen [Ca(NO3)2·4H2O] and CuSO4·H2O. Low rates of NH4NO3 (39 to 79 mg·L-1 N) reduced disease, but rates above 100 mg·L-1 N increased it. Disease was not affected by MgSO4·7H2O. In all cases, plant growth was inversely related to disease severity. Mineral fertilizers had no effect on nutrient solution pH. This information sheds new light on environmental factors that influence plant-pathogen interactions, and may be applied to develop a management strategy for Fusarium crown and root rot based on host nutrition.

Free access
Authors: and

Lycopersicon pennellii accession LA 1277 was crossed to tomato (L. esculentum) and the F1 was backcrossed to tomato. Self-pollinated seed was saved from backcross plants and seedlings derived were inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht f.sp. radicus-lycopersici Jarvis and Shoemaker, the causal agent of Fusarium crown and root rot (FCRR). Seed was saved from resistant plants that were self-pollinated and screened until homozygous resistance was verified five generations after the backcross. Three homozygous lines were crossed to Fla. 7547, a tomato breeding line susceptible to FCRR but resistant to Fusarium wilt races 1, 2, and 3. Subsequently, backcrosses were made to each parent and F2 seed were obtained. The three homozygous FCRR-resistant lines were also crossed to Ohio 89-1, which has a dominant gene for FCRR resistance presently being used in breeding programs. F2 seed were obtained from these crosses. These generations were inoculated with the FCRR pathogen. The resistant parents, F1, and backcross to the resistant parents were all healthy. The backcross to the susceptible parent and the F2 segregated healthy to susceptible plants in 1:1 and 3:1 ratios, respectively. Thus, the resistance from LA 1277 was inherited as a single dominant gene. This gene was different than the gene from Ohio 89-1 because susceptible segregants were detected in the F2 generation derived from the two resistant sources.

Free access

desiccation and soft; and 5 = severe decay with fluid leakage and/or very soft with severe desiccation, not consumable. Only the decay index at the end of 21 d is reported here. The data of the two harvests were combined. Fusarium crown and root rot, caused by

Free access

may reach up to 30% yield loss. Both fractures and rot occurred during fruit stalk development deep within the crown. Three major causal agents have been suggested as possible factors in this phenomenon: 1) mechanical cracks of unclear origin

Free access

Abstract

‘Ohio CR-6’ is a pink-fruited, tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) hybrid adapted to greenhouse culture with resistance to Fusarium crown and root rot (Fusarium oxys-porum f. sp. lycopersici radieus). It was released by the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Aug. 1982.

Open Access