Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,086 items for :

  • fruiting wall x
Clear All

). At the cell-wall level, fruit softening is a result of changes in interactions among cell-wall polysaccharides and their breakdown ( Knee, 1975 ). These changes in cell walls result from the activities of cell-wall–modifying enzymes. Ripening

Free access

storage quality of mango fruit, suggesting that ethylene biosynthesis may be associated with the occurrence of CI ( Nair and Singh, 2003 ). CI also causes damage to the cell wall of mango fruit, which includes the loss of wall structural integrity ( Han et

Free access
Authors: , , and

The irradiation of harvested fruit is typically accompanied by excessive tissue softening, a process that is not well understood. In this study, we examined the role of specific cell wall polymers and the extent of general cell wall degradation and softening in irradiated tomato fruit. `Sunny' tomato fruit at mature-green and pink stages were subjected to X-ray radiation at 0, 83, and 156 Krad. Immediate softening was noted for both maturation classes, although some postirradiation recovery was evident in green fruit. Pectic polymers of both mature-green and pink fruit exhibited depolymerization and altered neutral sugar profiles in response to irradiation. Pectins, either as components of total ethanol-insoluble solids (EIS), purified by selective extraction, or of commercial origin were similarly affected by irradiation. Cellulose preparations were unaffected by irradiation. The data demonstrate that the effect of irradiation on the cell wall exhibits specificity, can occur nonenzymatically, and does not require initiating adducts of cytosolic origin.

Free access
Authors: , , and

was to examine the expression of genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis, ethylene perception, and cell wall degradation in the fruit abscission zone and fruit cortex of ‘Golden Delicious’ and ‘Fuji’ apples during PFA and fruit ripening and to

Free access

study was to evaluate whether ethylene biosynthesis, ethylene perception, and cell wall degradation were involved in young fruit abscission caused by the chemical thinner NAA in ‘Delicious’ apples. Materials and Methods Plant material and

Free access
Authors: and

Cell wall changes during ripening have a major effect on fruit texture. The cell walls isolated using phenol-Tris buffer were sequentially extracted to give polysaccharide fractions that contained mainly water-soluble pectin, chelator-soluble (CDTA) pectin, hemicelluloses (0.05 M Na2CO3 followed by 1M and 4M KOH) and cellulose. The fractions were analyzed colorimetrically for uronic acid, total neutral sugar and cellulose contents. The component sugars of each fraction were determined as their alditol acetates by GC. Then was a decrease in the two pectin fractions during ripening. The pectins appear to have arabinan and galactan side chains. Pectic galactose decreases during ripening. The weight of the combined hemicellulose fractions did not change during ripening, nor did the cellulose level. At least two types of arabinan are present. Pectins were found in all cell wall fractions. Nashi cell walls contain a relatively large amount of xylan compared to other fruit.

Free access

Cell wall synthesis during development and ripening of `Rutgers', rin and nor tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit was quantified by monitoring incorporation of 14C into outer pericarp cell walls after pedicel injection of (U-14C) - sucrose. Fruit color (Hunter “a” and “b” values) and firmness (Instron) were also monitored. 14C-Incorporation continued throughout development and ripening in `Rutgers' cell walls and exhibited a transient increase from late maturegreen to the turning stage. Incorporation of 14C into cell walls of rin pericarp tissue was similar to `Rutgers' at 20 days pest-anthesls (DPA) (immature-green) but decreased to a level similar to red `Rutgers' fruit by 35 DPA. Incorporation of 14C into nor pericarp cell walls was low throughout the experimental period (20 to 75 DPA). In contrast to previous reports, rin and nor pericarp tissue exhibitad a decrease in firmness of the outer pericarp. However, the rate of softening was slower than in `Rutgers'. Pericarp tissue from rin and nor fruit at 70 and 75 DPA, respectively, resisted compression as much as pink `Rutgers' pericarp tissue.

Free access

) and polygalacturonase (PG), which are induced in the fruit abscission zone where they catalyze the breakdown of the middle lamellae and cell walls and promote fruit drop ( Bonghi et al., 2000 ; Ward et al., 1999 ). 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), a

Free access

Contribution no. D-126 of the Fruit Tree Research Station. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal regulations, this paper therefore must be hereby marked advertisement solely to

Free access

Calcium is an important constituent of the cell wall and plays roles in maintaining firmness of fruit and reducing postharvest decay. The modification of the cell wall is believed to be influenced by calcium that interacts with acidic pectic polymers to form cross-bridges. Infiltrating apples with CaCl2 has been suggested as an effective postharvest treatment for increasing the calcium content. Three different methodologies were used to analyze the effects of calcium on the cell walls: 1) nickel staining of polygalacturonate on free-hand sections, 2) cationic gold labeling of anionic binding sites in the cell walls, and 3) analytical detection of calcium ions (40Ca, 44Ca) using a secondary ion mass spectrometry. The combination of these methods allowed us to directly visualize the cellular features associated with the infiltration of calcium. Treatment resulted in significant enrichment in the cell wall of the pericarp, transformed the acidic pectins in calcium pectates, and resulted in new calcium cross-bridges. Evidence now suggests that exogenously applied calcium affects the cell wall by enhancing its strength and reinforcing adhesion between neighbor cells; therefore, calcium infiltration delays fruit degradation.

Free access