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109 ORAL SESSION 28 (Abstr. 572–579) Fruit Set & Seed Quality–Vegetables

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-growing fruits, this leads to alternating periods of high and low fruit set. These fluctuations in fruit set are believed to be the cause of cyclic fluctuations in fruit yield. Irregular fruit yield causes difficulties in the planning of activities throughout the

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brown and abscise, and can dramatically affect peach fruit set ( Rieger et al., 1991 ; Smith et al., 1994 ). A late spring frost can wipe out an entire peach crop. A mild spring frost may be helpful by thinning the fruitlets naturally, because many

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Pollination is an essential process for fruit set, fruit growth, fruit quality, and seed set of most apple cultivars. The first step of successful apple pollination is the transfer of pollen to the stigmatic surface (typically vectored by bees

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is highly variable among cultivars, years, and production regions. Low fruit set rate or premature fruitlet abscission are both factors that contribute to lower production (i.e., fruit drop). Multiple factors contribute toward suboptimal fruit set

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changes occurred frequently during the 2014 to 2018 period and were associated with erratic fruit set in blueberry. Production practice in recent years has shown that temperature stress constitutes the biggest obstacle to flowering and fruit setting in

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Leaf removal in the fruiting zone is a classical vineyard management practice in applied during the summer, from fruit set to veraison ( Reynolds et al., 1996 ). It is a pivotal operation on high-density canopies to improve clusters' microclimate (e

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is inevitable for greenhouse sweet pepper. This crop shows a clear pattern of fluctuation: periods of high fruit set alternate with periods of low fruit set; eventually, the numbers of harvestable fruit differ on a weekly and monthly basis

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,” persisting fruit were counted. Bloom density was expressed as the number of flower clusters per unit of limb cross-sectional area (LCSA) and final fruit set as either a percent fruit of the original number of blossom clusters or as the number per LCSA. In

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increase fruit set and cause a tree to retain more fruit than on nontreated trees ( Byers et al., 2004 ; Glenn and Miller, 2005 ; Greene, 1999 ). A more aggressive thinning program may be required to adequately reduce crop load on ProCa-treated trees

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