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Abstract

Forcing azalea (Rhododendron sp. cvs. Redwing, Mission Bells and Gloria were subjected to sufficient and low levels of N, K, and Ca, and the difference in concentration of these nutrients was measured and termed “differential”. Immature, recently mature, and old leaves were sampled periodically from current shoots during development. Ca differential was not related to sample position. N differential was exhibited in a similar manner but was best expressed in older leaf tissue during late growth. The magnitude of the K differential was related to both sample position and sample date; the largest expression occurred in young leaf tissue during early growth and on older leaf tissue during late shoot development. The best single sample position for foliar analysis of these nutrients was the most recently mature leaves on current shoots.

Open Access

Abstract

Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Poelln. ‘Feuerzauber’ plants were grown with sufficient and insufficient levels of N and Ca and differences in leaf concentrations of each nutrient between the sufficient and insufficient treatments (“differential”) were determined at various times between 5 and 14 weeks after planting and for a range of leaf positions. Largest N and Ca differentials generally occurred in the same leaves. In young plants, 5 to 7 weeks old, the largest differentials occurred in the young leaves immediately below the pinch. At 8 weeks the largest differentials were found in the young leaves on the lateral shoots. With increasing plant age the largest differentials were continually found in the younger leaves on lateral shoots. Throughout the 5 to 14 week period, leaves which had the largest consistent differentials were young developing leaves at least 2 cm wide and are deemed best suited for foliar analysis.

Open Access

breeding effort ( Sraffa, 2005 ; Willcox, 1954 ). Foliar nutrient analysis is a well-established method ( Munson and Nelson, 1990 ) to assist in the diagnosis of nutrient-related problems (deficiencies, toxicities, imbalances, etc.) of both annual and

Open Access

Highbush (Vaccinium corvmbosum L.) rabbiteye (V. ashei Reade) and southern highbush (Vaccinium spp.) blueberries grown at seven locations in six southern states were sampled in 1988 and 1989 to determine foliar elemental levels among blueberry cultivars and types. Across locations, elemental levels of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu and Al were similar for highbush and southern highbush types. Rabbiteye elemental levels were different from highbush and southern highbush for N, P, K, Ca, S, Mn, Cu and Al. The findings indicate that similar standard foliar levels can be used for highbush and southern highbush blueberries in determining nutritional status of plantings by foliar analysis. Rabbiteye blueberries appear to have different foliar levels, and may require species-specific standards for nutritional monitoring of plantings.

Free access

Abstract

In the paper, Effect of Nine Controlled-release Fertilizers on Chrysanthemum Growth and Foliar Analysis by Govind C. Sharma and Ashwin J. Patel (J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 103 (2): 148-150; 1978), the following correction should be made: The mean separation symbol for high rate of OSC-A in Table 3 should be “a” instead of “b.” Also, in Table 4, MagZmP should be read as MagAmP.

Open Access

Abstract

Principal component analysis of soil and foliar analysis and plant quality data for field-grown Salvia splendens Sello cv. Red Pillar was useful for pointing out relationships among these variables and suggested possible growth limiting factors. Soil P and foliar P, Ca, Cu, Zn, and N were found to be positively related to plant quality on the first principal component, whereas soil K, Ca, Mg, and NO3 and foliar Fe were negatively related to quality. The former elements are thought to be limiting growth in this situation, while the latter elements in some way suppress the uptake or utilization of the deficient elements. The third and fourth components described well known relationships of soil pH with soil and foliar concentrations of several elements.

Open Access

). Fig. 1. Principle component analysis plot of all four preharvest treatments of ‘Valencia’ orange trees including untreated control ( C ), foliar nutritional sprays ( N ), Insecticide sprays ( I ), I + N ( M ) for all 3 years (February–March harvests

Free access

its high efficiency ( Youryon et al. 2018 ). For these reasons, this study aimed to explore the effect of foliar spraying of a 0.3% CaCl 2 aqueous solution on the sugar content of ‘Feizixiao’ litchi fruit and to provide theoretical support for the

Open Access

Highbush (Vaccinium corymbosum L.), rabbiteye (V. ashei Reade), and southern highbush (Vaccinium spp.) blueberries grown at seven locations in six southern states were sampled in 1988 and 1989 to determine foliar elemental levels among blueberry cultivars and types. Across locations, elemental levels of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, and Al were similar for highbush and southern highbush types. Rabbiteye elemental levels were different from highbush and southern highbush for N, P, K, Ca, S, Mn, Cu, and Al. Rabbiteye blueberries appear to have different foliar levels, and may require species-specific standards for nutritional monitoring of plantings.

Free access

Abstract

Single application of 9 controlled-release fertilizers applied prior to planting and liquid fertilization applied at each watering were evaluated on pot chrysanthemum, Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat cv. Sunny Mandalay. Three rates (20, 40 and 60 g N/35 liter of mix) were applied of the following controlled-release fertilizers (N−P−K): Sulfur-coated urea (36−0−0 as SCU-A and SCU-B), Osmocote (14−6.1 − 11.6) and 18−2.6−9.8) Mag AmP (7−17.5−5.0 as fine and coarse), Precise (8−4.8−4.1 and 12−2.6−5.0) and Agriform (14−1.7−5.0). Liquid fertilization applied 200 ppm N, P2O5 and K2O with each watering. Generally 60 g N/35 liter resulted in higher quality plants than did the lower rates, effect of Osmocote (14−6.1−11.6) on plant dry weight, visual rating and plant spread was not significantly different from liquid fertilizer. Precise (8−4.8−4.1), Osmocote (18− 2.6−9.8) and coarse MagAmP produced marketable plants of slightly lower quality than those obtained with liquid feed. Problems observed were primarily those of nutrient balance: very low P (SCU) and high P content (MagAmP); P-induced Mn deficiency (MagAmP); some lower leaf burn with initial high N release (Precise) and injury probably caused by ammonium and high rates of urea formaldehyde-based fertilizer (Agriform). The low initial release of N to support vegetative growth was also an important limitation with Agriform and other fertilizers.

Open Access