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Yue Sun and Lowell C. Ewart

A dominant gene, R, is hypothesized to control the red underfoliage color inheritance in tetraploid fibrous-rooted Begonia × semperflorens-cultorum. This dominant gene R is considered to also affect the intensity of the foliage color, with RRRR and RRRr giving dark red color on the underside of the leaves. The combination of RRrr and Rrrr gives intermediate red coloration, and homozygous recessive rrrr gives all green foliage. A homozygous RRRR inbred line is being test-crossed for potential commercial value. Cytological investigations of hybrids and inbreds derived from species crosses are ongoing. The results will be presented.

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Mark H. Brand

Container production of recently-developed and popular Kalmia latifolia cultivars has not been fully optimized. A study was conducted using six cultivars grown in full sun, 40% shade or 60% shade. Under 60% shade, plant height was reduced slightly, but shading, at either 40% or 60%, had no significant effect on all other measured growth parameters. Plants were too young to set significant numbers of flower buds, so the study will be continued a second year to quantify the effects of shade on flower bud set. Foliage color was measured using a Minolta CR-200 Chroma Meter. As shading increased, hue angle increased and the chroma and value of the color decreased, indicating that shading produced greener (less yellow), darker and duller foliage colors. Foliar chlorophyll content increased with increasing shading. Higher foliar chlorophyll content correlates with greener leaves in shaded treatments and is likely contributing to the green color. Using moderate levels of shade over container-grown Kalmia could allow growers to produce greener, more marketable plants without sacrificing plant growth.

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John R. Stommel and Robert J. Griesbach

line G02C17 resulted in F 1 progeny with color scores intermediate between the two parental lines ( Table 1 ). The F 1 color score corresponds to a greenish black foliage phenotype. Recombinants with extremes of green or black foliage pigmentation

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Rob Kuper

, regardless of arrangement. Numerous, distinct colors, textures, shapes, and physical dimensions of foliage, flowers, path materials, topography, and structures act as identifying attributes of complexity. Stamps (2004) indicated that “some sort of relation

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W. Garrett Owen and Roberto G. Lopez

In floriculture crops, aesthetic qualities, including flower and foliage color or variegation, influence consumers’ initial perceptions and thus, purchasing decisions. For instance, Berghage and Wolnick (2000) surveyed and reported that consumers

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Kenneth R. Summy and Christopher R. Little

growth, which consists primarily of Capnodium and related fungal species ( Farr et al., 1989 ; Reynolds, 1999 ). Fig. 1. Examples of color RGB and color infrared photographs (insets) of foliage acquired in a whole plant context and used to

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Jongyun Kim, Seung Won Kang, Chun Ho Pak and Mi Seon Kim

al., 2011 ). House plants also fulfill psychological needs of people by providing green color and comfort and enhance the indoor environment to make it more aesthetically pleasing ( Bringslimark et al., 2007 ). Foliage plants are often used as house

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W. Garrett Owen and Roberto G. Lopez

* (resulting in a change in foliage color from green to red) compared with those under the control ( Table 4 ). Over time, EOP SL providing 100 µmol·m −2 ·s −1 resulted in the most rapid increase in a*, whereas light provided by the control, HPS lamps, and low

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Tina M. Waliczek, Dave Byrne and Don Holeman

choice of plants ( Table 1 ). Other characteristics such as foliage color, foliage glossiness, flower size, and number of petals fell in between these most- and least-selected categories ( Table 1 ). When choosing a height preference for rose shrubs, most