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Abstract

The rest period and the development of cranberry flowers, Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait., cv. Stevens, were studied for 2 consecutive years. Long days were found to be necessary for the normal outgrowth of the fruit bud; no flowers were produced under short days. Increased chilling was required to produce bud break when the plants were given short days. Under favorable light conditions, 80% of the buds grew out after 600 hr below 45°F. Production of normal flowers was not ensured by satisfaction of cold requirement but also involved exposure of buds to temp above 45°F.

Gibberellic acid (GA3) caused 80% or more of the buds to break, regardless of chilling treatment, and caused faster bud break even after adequate chilling. Functionally “male-sterile” flowers with contorted anther tubes were produced occasionally from buds given adequate chilling and GA3.

Open Access

Abstract

The “after-rest” and “post-rest” quiescent periods of flower buds of 2 peach cultivars of different chilling requirements were characterized by a period of reduced inhibition during which the degree of inhibition decreased each succeeding week. Buds within this reduced period of inhibition appeared to be quiescent since they broke and grew during 2 weeks in a greenhouse. However, during this period the buds responded to GA3 and chilling temp. The “post-rest” quiescent period was not reached until mid-February, at which time the buds no longer responded to GA3 or additional chilling and bud break occurred within 72 to 84 hours after exposure to the greenhouse environment.

The degree of inhibition of buds of the 2 cultivars varied throughout this study. ‘Redhaven’ buds were more inhibited than buds of ‘Redskin’ throughout the period studied.

Open Access
Authors: and

Abstract

Time intervals between leaf emergence, flower stalk emergence, and flower cut were determined for 550 Strelitzia reginae Ait. (Bird of Paradise) flowers during 1977–80 at an elevation of 25 m in Hawaii. The interval between leaf emergence and flower stalk emergence averaged 186 days with a range of 173 to 204. The interval between flower stalk emergence and flower cut averaged 64 days with a range of 54 to 74. Seasonal differences in the duration of development did not account for the seasonal differences in yield. Dissection of flowering fans revealed sequences of flower bud abortion which occurred during June to October, and accounted for low flower production during winter and early spring months in Hawaii.

Open Access

. can bloom many times in 1 year, and the flowering period is very long. The development of a single flower can be divided into the young bud stage, three green stage, two white stage, white stage, silver stage, golden stage, and fade stage, appearing as

Free access

frost. First date of flowering was defined as the first appearance of petal color on any flower of a given plant, and last date of flowering was defined as the date when no petal color was detected on a plant. Flowering period was calculated as the

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cultivars in flower and pollen attributes were tested by considering only the results from the basal two clusters in the main flowering period which all cultivars produced. Cluster position was not significant, so data from both clusters were combined and

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monitor plant size for the cultivars over the study period. In late August or early September, cultivar seed densities were determined using previously marked branches with the same equipment and methods. Flower and seed counting dates were chosen based on

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the predictive residual sum of squares (PRSS) was used to compare the models. The lower the value of PRSS, the higher the predictive power. Results Plants from all treatments flowered and produced a flower stem during the assessment period

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. During this latter period, flower initiation and further development takes place. The number of days from the start of SD to harvest is referred to as the reaction time, and this trait is very sensitive to temperature, showing a definite temperature

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For most cut flowers, water balance is a vital factor for maximizing postharvest longevity. Unlike intact flowers, where life is ended either by color change, petal wilting, or abscission, cut flower life is often ended as a consequence of water

Open Access