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Abstract

Flower bud abortion, which can influence crop maturity, has been observed in gynoecious and/or predominantly pistillate strains of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) Pre-anthesis abortion was completely dominant to non-abortion. The flower bud abortive trait tentatively assigned the symbol Fba was shown to be linked with femaleness with an average map distance of 18 crossover units.

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Abstract

In pecan [Carya illinoensis (Wangenh.) C. Koch)], pistillate flower production is positively and abortion is inversely correlated with growth of the supporting shoot. Shoot growth from 1-year-old branches of 4- and 8-cm lengths was increased by pruning all other branches from the supporting limb. Pistillate flower production increased and subsequent abortion decreased with increasing shoot vigor. The results demonstrate a cause-and-effect relationship between shoot vigor and pistillate development and abortion.

Open Access

Abstract

Abortion of pistillate flowers and fruit was determined in ‘Cherokee’, ‘Success’, ‘Stuart’, and ‘Desirable’ pecans [Carya illinoensis (Wang.) K. Koch]. Abortion occurred in 4 periods during the growth cycle of the fruit. The distinctness and magnitude of the drops varied greatly among cultivars. Total seasonal abortion was inversely related to the alternate bearing tendency of the cultivars. The 1st drop varied inversely with shoot length, the 2nd drop coincided with abortion of nonpollinated flowers and was increased by selling, and the 3rd drop coincided with abortion induced by self-pollination. The majority of fruit loss during the 4th drop followed fruit split or discoloration. This drop correlated with high soil moisture and humidity. However, a lesser drop, from embryo abortion, also is proposed to occur at this time.

Open Access

Reduction of floral number in Capsicum annuum has been observed during growth at high temperature. To determine whether decreased flower production or increased flower abscission is a direct response to high temperatures or a response to water stress induced by high temperatures, we compared flowers and fruit produced and flowers aborted to leaf growth rate, osmotic potential, stomatal conductance, and chlorophyll fluorescence of two cultivars. To determine the stage(s) of floral development that are most sensitive to high temperatures, flower buds were wax-embedded and examined at each stage of development during heat treatment. Rate of floral development also was examined. At first visible floral bud initiation, plants were transferred to each of three controlled environment growth chambers with set temperatures and vapor pressure deficits (VPD) of 25°C, 1.1 kPa; 33°C, 1.1 kPa; and 33°C, 2.1 kPa. Flower bud production and leaf growth rate were not significantly affected by high temperatures. Pepper fruit set, however, was inhibited at 33°C at either VPD. Preliminary water relations data suggested that water potentials were more negative under high temperature conditions. Differences in leaf fluorescence were statistically significant for temperature treatments, but not for VPD. Temperature is the primary factor in the decrease of fruit production in pepper. Decreased production is due to flower abortion and not to decreased flower initiation or plant growth.

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Abortion of distillate flowers (PFA) in a protandrous cultivar of walnut (Juglans regia L. cv. Serr) was increased by N deficiency. Starch and N concentrations in wood of 2-year-old twigs decreased to minimal levels during abortion of distillate flowers. Nitrogen reserves in woody tissues were reduced by foliar N deficiency, as were concentrations of sugars and N in vacuum-extracted xylem sap. Abortive distillate flowers ceased growth before spur leaves reached 50% of full expansion. PFA may result from transient deficiencies of C and N during the spring flush of growth. Depletion of storage C and N was accentuated before maturation of distillate flowers in this cultivar by the metabolic demands of many catkins, spur growth, and leaf expansion.

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Abstract

Alkvlnaphthalenes are used as solvents for chlorinated insecticides and herbicides. Johnson, Veomans, and Smith (2) reported that these solvents could cause the death of the apical meristems of chrysanthemums when applied in concentrated solutions or in mechanically or thermallv generated aerosols. Controlling the number of flowers and fruits on a stem is not only of academic interest but of practical importance. Thev are now controlled on chrysanthemums by removing the excess by hand. Research reported in this paper show that HAN,R a petroleum fraction containing a large percentage of alkvlnaphthalenes. can be used to control the number of flowers borne by chrysanthemum plants.

Open Access

) , gender differentiation in amur grape belongs to model I. Time of pistil abortion in male amur grape. The stagnation of development of female organ occurs at different stages in different plant species. In male flowers of mahogany, the ovule primordia

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ornamental values as described. We also recorded the bud opening rate and flower abortion rate during the vase period. The bud opening rate is expressed as the percentage of the number of bloom flowers to the total number of flower buds, whereas the flower

Open Access

application during flowering or fruit setting can result in flower or fruit abortion ( Southwick and Glozer, 2000 ). Our previous study found that exogenous GA 3 applied at the budbreak initiation stage promoted budbreak but caused a nonsignificant yield

Open Access

high rates of inflorescence abortion. They could be determined after microscopic examination of the apical meristem showed successful flower induction, but only a few plants actually flowered. Table 1 summarizes the duration from the planting date

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