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The commercial floriculture industry in the United States includes bedding and garden plants, potted flowering and foliage plants, propagative material, cut flowers, and cut cultivated greens ( USDA, 2008 ). Most floriculture crops are produced

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The increasing number of crops being grown for the floriculture market has frustrated educators faced with limited classroom and laboratory time. Time constraints necessitate selection of crops to serve as examples of floral induction treatment(s) and provide an accurate scope of production requirements for all cultivated species. Since flowers are the primary reason for purchasing most floricultural products—with the notable exception of cut and potted foliage—the various treatments required for flower bud initiation and development were used to categorize potted plants. New and old crops (>70 species) are categorized for flower bud initiation and development requirements, including photoperiod (short, long day, day neutral; facultative/obligate responses), vernalization, temperature, autonomous, rest period, and dormancy. Crop-specific temperature, irradiance, and photoperiod interactions are noted, as well as temperature × photoperiod interactions. A course syllabus can be modified to ensure that at least one crop from each category is presented to serve as a model. It is recommended that the class focuses on example crop(s) from each floral induction category and then reviews other crops within each category for differences or similarities. This method allows coverage of floral induction categories without leaving information gaps in the students' understanding. This method was used with students in the Fall 1999, floriculture production class (Hort 4051) at the University of Minnesota, St. Paul.

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A survey of floricultural education was conducted for presentation at an International Horticultural Congress Workshop in Aug. 1986. Based on discussion at the workshop, data collected were double-checked with contact persons at each college or university, and the revised data are presented herein (Table 1).

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The cut-flower and potted plant industries in Australia have traditionally been based on exotic species. However, native Australian plants have gradually assumed greater importance—particularly in the expanding export trade, but also on local markets. Floriculture is practiced in all Australian states, with the major production areas for exotic cut-flowers (e.g., roses, carnations) and potted plants being close to the state capital cities. The cultivation of native Australian flowers and of South African Proteaceae tends to be somewhat more decentralized.

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The commercial floriculture industry in the United States includes bedding and garden plants, potted flowering and foliage plants, propagative material, cut flowers, and cut cultivated greens ( USDA, 2008 ). According to the 2007 Census of

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, bouquet packaging, and venue decoration for weddings or funerals. Relevant floriculture courses are rarely offered as part of formal education; therefore, most practitioners acquire their basic design skills through apprenticeships, nongovernmental

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Potted spring-flowering bulbs and bedding and garden plants collectively account for $1.97 billion (49%) of the total U.S. wholesale value of floriculture crops for the 15 top-producing states ( U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2011 ). These crops

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The review by Evans and Sorger (6) on “The Role of Mineral Elements with Emphasis on the Univalent Cations” as found in the 1966 Annual Review of Plant Physiology Volume 17 is principally concerned with other than floriculture crops. However, the K nutritional requirements of floriculture crops are so similar to those of vegetables that the review can stand for both.

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Abstract

One of the prerequisites for a thriving profession of floriculture and ornamental horticulture is a continuing supply of enthusiastic and well-trained young people, who will eventually move into leadership and management positions. We need young people who have comprehensive bases in the fundamental sciences that underlie our profession, but who also have hands-on and practical backgrounds in the applications of this science to the art and sciences of horticulture. We need people who will eventually staff and manage our greenhouses and nurseries in production- and marketing-oriented positions. We also need scientists holding advanced degrees who will fill the teaching, research, and extension positions in our colleges, universities, and research institutes in the years to come.

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