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A one-time application of fish emulsion 2 days before the application of plant growth regulators (PGR) showed an overriding effect on the growth of pansies. Blue/blotch shades of `Medallion' pansies were placed on a constant feed program of 100 ppm Peat Lite 20N–10P–20K, with half of the pansies receiving an additional one-time supplement of fish emulsion. PGRs and rates included B-Nine, 0.5% (used as the control); uniconazole, 2 and 4 ppm; and paclobutrazol, 16 and 25 ppm. Parameters taken included plant height, top fresh weight, top dry weight, days to anthesis, and visual appearance. Significant differences were noted in the plants receiving the supplement for plant dry weight, plant height, and visual appearance. Plants receiving fish emulsion grew taller and denser than those on constant feed alone despite the effects of the PGRs.

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Review Institute-approved fish emulsion or feather meal in organic systems. Most species of blueberry are adapted to low soil pH conditions in the range of 4.5 to 5.5 and require NH 4 -N over NO 3 -N for uptake. Nitrogen uptake increases throughout the

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approved by the Organic Materials Review Institute, including fish emulsion or feather meal as sources of N. Fish emulsion is applied as a direct liquid application to the soil of the in-row area or is injected through the drip irrigation system. Feather

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Rollins, 1947 ; Hanson, 2006 ; Hart et al., 2006 ) at an estimated cost of $1 to $2/kg for synthetic N fertilizer. Organic blueberry farmers commonly use Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI)-approved fish emulsion as a direct liquid application or

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Nitrogen (N), a limiting nutrient in all agricultural systems, can be difficult to manage in certified organic vegetable production. Organic agriculture relies heavily on fertilizers and soil amendments from off-farm sources such as fish emulsion

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. An OMRI-approved fish hydrolysate and fish emulsion blend were diluted 1:3 (v/v) with water and applied through the drip system using a combination of a water-driven pump fertilizer injector (Mix-Rite 571 CW; DEMA, St. Louis, MO) and an electric, low

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; Humalfa, Inc., Shattuck, Okla.) incorporated before planting followed by fertigation with fish emulsion 5N–0.4P–0.8K (Lilly Miller Brands, Clackamas, Ore.). Conventional plots received 13N–5.7P–10.8K preplant and fertigation with calcium nitrate 15.5N–0P–0

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afterward to flush the drip lines. Plants were fertigated with fish emulsion to provide 8.0 kg·ha −1 N on 15 Apr. and 16 kg·ha −1 N each on 9 May and 1 and 20 June in 2011 and with 14 kg·ha −1 N each on 23 Apr., 8 May, and 7 and 13 June in 2012 (56 kg

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A segment of the greenhouse crop market would like to obtain vegetables and herbs that are certified organic. The technology for the use of biological controls for insects and diseases is well-developed and a significant part of greenhouse vegetable production. Organic fertilizers, however, have not been well-utilized in organic greenhouse vegetable production. Common organic fertilizers were analyzed for the levels of nutrients when mixed with water for use in greenhouse fertigation. Products derived from algae-Algamin (liquid) and Ohrstrom's Garden Maxicrop (powder), Bat Guano, and products derived from fish waste-GreenAll Fish Emulsion (liquid) and Mermaid's Fish Powder, demonstrated nutrient levels comparable to typical water-soluble fertilizers used for greenhouse plant production. Although the organic fertilizers could not be used as a concentrate for injector systems, readings from a conductivity meter were directly related to nitrate nitrogen levels and could be used for fertilizer management in the capillary mat subirrigation system used for plant production.

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This article reports on the physiological effects and horticultural benefits of chemical blossom thinners on 9-year-old and 12-year-old `Bing'/`Gisela®5′ sweet cherry trees in 2004 and 2005, respectively. Chemical thinning agents were applied at 20% and 80% full bloom (FB) by air-blast sprayer and were comprised of: 2% ammonium thiosulphate (ATS), 4% vegetable oil emulsion (VOE), 2% fish oil + 2.5% lime sulfur (FOLS), 1% tergitol, and an untreated control. Leaf gas exchange, leaf SPAD meter readings, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, fruit yield, and fruit quality were evaluated. FOLS, tergitol, VOE, and ATS suppressed leaf net CO2 exchange rate (NCER) by 33%, 30%, 28%, and 18%, respectively, over a variable length recovery period directly after 80% FB treatment. Leaf NCER recovered fully from every thinning treatment. Reductions in leaf NCER were unrelated to gS. VOE reduced estimated leaf chlorophyll content the greatest, suppressing overall levels by 11% for 23 days after treatment. All blossom thinners reduced constant fluorescence (Fo). No thinning agent reduced fruit set or yield in 2004. ATS, FOLS, and tergitol reduced fruit set in 2005. VOE was ineffective as a thinner yet exhibited significant leaf phytotoxicity. Among thinners, there was no relationship between inhibition of leaf NCER and thinning efficacy.

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