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Abstract

Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) sprayed as a 1% ethyl ester or sodium salt formulation below the grafts effectively controlled trunk and limb sprouts on topworked fig trees (Ficus carica L.). Reduction of scion growth and numbers of sprouts on unsprayed portions of grafted limbs indicated translocation of NAA for a distance of at least 10 cm.

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% and 58%, respectively). Results obtained in this study were in agreement with previous investigations on other fruit trees or other fig cultivars, which have shown that all growth parameters decreased as salinity increased ( Anjum, 2008 ; Ferguson et

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diameter were closely related to trunk cross-sectional trunk area ( Fig. 3 ). The slopes were similar for tree height and canopy diameter, indicating that growth in height and width occurs at approximately the same rate when trees are not excessively

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establishment. We found transplanted trees grown with organic mulch tended to have less negative predawn ψ L and similar or greater growth when compared with transplanted trees grown without mulch ( Tables 1 and 2 ; Figs. 1 and 2 ). Because restoration of

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slower growth and can be calculated by using simple rules. In Pałubicki et al. (2009) , the tree is therefore assembled from interconnected internodes and buds ( Fig. 1A ). The first metamer represents the base of the tree. New metamers grow out of buds

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growth habit and flowering time has not been previously reported. Hybridization of ‘A72’ × columnar peach trees. As expected ( Fig. 1 ), all hybrid progenies in the main (47 trees) and supporting (66 trees total) populations were columnar (pillar

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explained by the changes observed in stem ψ over the course of the growing season as affected by the variable seasonal rainfall ( Figs. 1 and 3 ). Table 2. Mean midday stem water potential and trunk diameter growth of ‘Desirable’ pecan trees under

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, central leader, rootstock shank, and roots). Accumulation of nutrients in the whole tree. Total tree N increased very rapidly from bloom to the end of shoot growth, and then continued to increase, but at a slower rate to fruit harvest ( Fig. 4A

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from different nursery production methods ( Tables 1 – 5 ; Figs. 1 and 2 ). Table 1. Comparisons of mean planting times and planting time variation for red oak and swamp white oak trees and among trees from balled and burlap, pot-in-pot container, in

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. Leader growth and mortality (averaged overall sites) for fraser fir Christmas trees treated with various concentrations of Sucker-Stopper RTU using the Easy Roller. Data points: n = 150; bars = se of the mean. Fig. 4. Length ( A ), mortality ( B ), and

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