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This research was supported by a grant from the California Fig Institute. I thank Anne Whittlesey, Qinglong Zhang, and Abdul Jalil for help with sample collection and analysis. Mention of a product or trade name does not imply endorsement or

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The common fig is a popular backyard fruit tree and grown in small orchards throughout the coastal regions of the southeastern U.S. Two commonly grown cultivars in coastal areas have distinct fruiting patterns which would be of interest to processors and marketers of summertime fruit. A study was conducted over a 5-year period to determine the fruiting characteristics of `Celeste' and `LSU Purple' figs. The 9-year-old orchard used for the study is located in St. Gabriel, LA. Annual results over a 5-year period indicated a longer and more productive fruit-bearing season for `LSU Purple' than `Celeste'. The fruit-bearing cycle for `LSU Purple' is about 4 weeks longer than is for `Celeste'. `Celeste' and `LSU Purple' exhibited different fruiting patterns over a 5-year period. `Celeste' consistently produced ripe fruit about one week before `LSU Purple' over the 5-year period. `Celeste' produced 85% of its total yield in a 2-week period with one main crop per year. However, `LSU Purple' produced two and sometimes three distinct crops each year. `LSU Purple' produced a greater total yield compared to `Celeste' with 6.45 kg/tree compared to 4.57 kg for `Celeste' during the 5-year evaluation. Additionally, `LSU Purple' retained foliage longer each year than `Celeste'; a characteristic perhaps due to a higher level of resistance to fig leaf rust. In areas where `LSU Purple' is adapted, this selection of fig may offer a more productive alternative to traditional cultivars planted.

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instances, they use drip irrigation. On the other hand, a greenhouse has an air-inflated double layer of plastic, with fully automated ventilation and heating systems. A greenhouse provides much more environmental control of the cropping environment. Fig. 1

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size adjusted for crop load and yield efficiency for nectarines of different harvest seasons in Chile. Fig. 2. Yield efficiency expressed as ( A ) kg·m −2 PAR i and ( B ) fruit size as a function of increasing crop load expressed

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Fig. 2 . In Year 1, 3 d after the Partial-season cover crop was sprayed with an herbicide, the cover crops had accumulated 0.76 ton/acre dry matter (DM) and 71 lb/acre N ( Fig. 2A and B ). When the cover crop was sprayed in the Partial-season treatment

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San Pedro types are in part defined by the setting of a breba crop, some common figs will also produce brebas. Brebas are the first figs of the season, setting on wood from the previous year, and typically mature in June in the Central Valley of

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hairy vetch mulch systems produced fruit that was more uniform throughout the season ( Abdul-Baki et al., 1996 ). Therefore, no-till tomato production with cover crops might be a good alternative to protect the soil and the environment while decreasing

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describe the potential of high tunnels to support various crops grown during the winter. In this study, three passive-solar high-tunnel designs of different expense and expected heat-retention capacities were evaluated across three winter seasons (2009

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took place 11 Sept. 2014 and 2015. Fig. 2. Weekly accumulated precipitation and individual irrigation events for sweet corn growing season at Hancock, WI, in 2014 and 2015. Cover crop planting occurred on 24 Apr. 2014 and 17 Apr. 2015, and sweet corn

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seasons but also because of the presence of plastic mulch. The ETo and crop water requirement through evapotranspiration (ETc) followed similar patterns as previously described for temperature during each season ( Fig. 2A and B ). Due to the decreasing

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