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studies, only the traditional budgeting approach and sensitivity analysis was employed. In this study, we develop and investigate a simple framework for stochastic farm enterprise budgets. Specifically, we estimate the costs, revenues, and profitability

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across crops. This information will help growers determine which crops are relatively profitable. So far, such information has been neglected in enterprise budgeting analyses of ornamental production. By comparing and aggregating a set of crops similar to

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data were then used to develop enterprise budgets for each of the farms. Table 2. Assumptions used in the partial budget to estimate cider apple harvesting costs. The partial budget accounts for the cider apple orchard design, yield, hand

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Early okra production was evaluated using `Clemson Spineless' transplants grown under clear polyethylene mulch plus VisPore row cover (VCM), black polyethylene mulch plus VisPore row cover (VBM), clear polyethylene mulch (CM), black polyethylene mulch (BM) and bare soil (BS) for two years. Early yield (1st four harvests in early June) was significantly greater for VCM treatment while total marketable yield at the end of 8 wks were significantly greater for VCM, BM, and VBM treatments, respectively in both years. Enterprise budget analysis showed that VCM and BM treatments had the highest net-return to management on a per acre basis.

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Early okra production was evaluated using `Clemson Spineless' transplants grown under clear polyethylene mulch plus VisPore row cover (VCM), black polyethylene mulch plus VisPore row cover (VBM), clear polyethylene mulch (CM), black polyethylene mulch (BM) and bare soil (BS) for two years. Early yield (1st four harvests in early June) was significantly greater for VCM treatment while total marketable yield at the end of 8 wks were significantly greater for VCM, BM, and VBM treatments, respectively in both years. Enterprise budget analysis showed that VCM and BM treatments had the highest net-return to management on a per acre basis.

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Abstract

The economic feasibility of using hexazinone for weed control in lowbush blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) was determined by using the partial budgeting technique. Four rates of hexazinone were evaluated to determine the effect on net income in a blueberry enterprise. Response function analysis also was utilized to ascertain the hexazinone level that would maximize blueberry yield and profitability. Partial budget analysis indicated that hexazinone use at 1.1, 2.2, and 4.5 kg/ha was expected to increase net income, indicating its use was economically feasible. Hexazinone use at 9 kg/ha was judged to be economically infeasible, since it decreased net income. Response function analysis revealed that 2.3 kg/ha of hexazinone maximized profits. Chemical names used: 3-cyclohexyl-6-(dimethylamino)-1-methyl-1,3,5-tria-zine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione (hexazione).

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The food crop concentration in the horticulture major was revised in response to discussions with students, faculty, and county agents to emphasis more service learning. A requirement for an internship or practicum was added. The practicum entails the design, maintenance, and data collection of the vegetable and small fruit display gardens. Emphasis will be on sustainable production and on collection of information for use in extension fact sheets for the citizens of Colorado. Other changes include the modularization of the commodity courses to provide greater flexibility and the addition of a capstone course. The capstone course will involve greater interaction with industry in the state and has a requirement for the development of both an enterprise budget as well as a production plan for a commercial operation.

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An interdisciplinary approach had been developed to examine the production, economic, and marketing feasibility of new crops. The methodology requires the determination of yield potential and product quality, construction of production budgets, and completion of marketing window analyses. Potential for integration of new crops into the existing farm enterprise is assessed using linear programing techniques that consider labor and equipment constraints, crop rotations and best management practices. Risk analyses consider yield, production costs, and price of both new and traditional crops. By using this method, broccoli has been identified as a potential new crop for eastern Virginia, with labor requirements and slush ice availability being the major constraints to integration into vegetable production in this area.

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This study examined the potential economic returns of using four different sources of nitrogen on `calabaza' pumpkins, a low moisture variety consumed as starch by many foreign nationals. Yields were 12.4, 12.6, 8.2 and 9.5 kg/plant for ammonium nitrate, sodium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and urea, respectively. Assuming 1989 farm gate prices in Alabama and other appropriate cost for vaious inputs used, the estimated return at $0.30/lb of pumpkin was $10,003, $10,115, $6,105 and $7,371/acre for different sources of nitrogen, respectively. The relatively higher return from sodium nitrate use explains the use of this source of nitrogen on rented land. A sensitivity analysis of the enterprise budgets shows a breakeven price between $0.02 and $0.10/lb.

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Yield, input, and economic data from research plots in central Mississippi are being used to test the economic potential of organic vegetable crop production. A six-part, multi-year rotation, including winter and summer cover crops, has been set up to generate yield, cost, and economic return data from vegetables produced in Mississippi using methods allowed by the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture National Organic Standards and accepted by local growers employing pesticide-free and other similar management methods. Data being collected include labor and input costs, yields, and market prices for harvested crops. Marketable produce is being sold through a grower-retailer at a farmer's market. During 2004, the first full year of the rotation, 10 vegetable species were included in the plots. Pest pressure has generally been minimal. With one exception [one of two potato (Solanum tuberosum) cultivars failed to produce a good stand], all crops planted have produced fair to excellent yields. Crops generating high retail prices in this study include potatoes, snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), and leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa). In the future, the yield and price data being generated will be combined with new and existing cost data to create enterprise and production budgets for use by perspective and existing organic vegetable growers.

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