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handling ( Schultheis et al., 2000 ; Wang et al., 2013 ). In the past 5 to 10 years, two problems have emerged in some locations that have seriously reduced pack-out efficiency: end rots and internal necrosis. The end rot complex includes aggressive rots

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20.91%, respectively, and those percentages were significantly lower as compared with T 3:3 . Fig. 1. ( A ) Number of blossom-end rot (BER) fruit per plant, ( B ) number of non-BER fruit per plant, ( C ) incidence of BER, ( D ) BER fruit fresh yield

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) temperatures and relative humidity at the trial location for bell pepper grown in Tifton, GA, in 2016 and 2017. Table 2. Interactions for marketable yields of total, jumbo, extra-large, large, and medium fruit as well as culls due to blossom end rot (BER) and

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treatment. Table 4. Incidence and yield of fruit with blossom-end rot in ‘Mt. Fresh Plus’ tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ) grown in a greenhouse and treated with different concentrations of Ca in the hydroponic fertilizer solution. Incidence of BER in fruit

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Abstract

Fruit of ‘Ruby Red’ grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) were treated postharvest with sodium-o-phenylphenate (SOPP), benomyl, imazalil, and etaconazole and stored under ambient conditions or were treated with SOPP, imazalil, and etaconazole and stored at 12°C. Imazalil and etaconazole were as effective as benomyl under ambient conditions and were more effective than SOPP under refrigerated conditions; 85% of the stem-end-rot was caused by Phomopsis citri (Fawc).

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A 2-year study was conducted in eastern Oregon to evaluate the effects of hooped spunbonded polypropylene rowcovers and calcium fertilization on yield and quality of drip-irrigated bell pepper grown on black plastic mulch. The experiment was a complete factorial with four replications of two varieties, covered and uncovered plots, and three levels of supplemental calcium fertilization at 0, 34 and 68 kg·ha–1 applied through the drip irrigation system as Ca(NO3)2. Marketable yields increased with rowcover, both at the first harvest and over the season. Blossom-end rot and sunscald were reduced substantially by rowcovers; the effect was greatest during the earlier harvests. First harvest and season total yield of fancy grade peppers increased linearly as rate of supplemental calcium increased, as did total marketable yield at the first harvest. There was a trend to decreasing yield of fruit with blossom-end rot as calcium rate increased, and the percent fruit with blossom-end rot at the first harvest decreased linearly with increasing rate of calcium fertilization. Yield of fruit affected by sunscald decreased linearly as supplemental calcium rate increased at the first harvest; overall, yield of sunscald fruit was reduced by application of calcium at either rate.

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Abstract

‘Tommy Atkins’ (Mangifera indica L.) is an important mango cultivar grown in Mexico. A new disease, causing heavy fruit loss and not yet reported in any other mango, was noted in 1973 and has since spread to all plantings of ‘Tommy Atkins’. Losses vary from 10% to 80% depending on season, less in dry than in wet years. The disease appears only on physiologically overmature fruit, and is not transmitted to healthy fruit after harvest, even in storage (3). It is a dry rot, visible at the stem end as a necrotic zone, grayish or dark in color, sometimes confused with the external color of the fruit itself. The internal tissue below the stalk end is dark brown, fibrous, extending to the pulp and stone (endocarp) and affecting the seed (Fig. 1). The cut end of the peduncle often shows darkened resin ducts.

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Abstract

A 6-parent diallel was used to investigate the relationship between blossom-end rot (BER) and the uniform-ripe fruiting trait of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). Three parents possessed the uniform-ripe character (uu), and 3 parents bore green-shouldered fruit (UU). Data were collected during 6 harvests for both BER incidence (%) and severity (lesion size). Significant differences existed among the F1 genotypes UU, Uu, and uu for BER incidence (P=5%) and severity (P=l%). BER incidence tended to increase as the u allele increased from 0 to 2.

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Paper mulch and black plastic mulch were compared with no mulch on tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. `Better Boy' and `San Marzano') for incidence of blossom-end rot (BER) in the field during 1988–90. Early season (late July to late August) harvest had more BER than in later pickings. Black plastic mulch significantly increased early season BER in `Better Boy' relative to paper or no mulch. Late-season BER in `San Marzano' was decreased with paper or black plastic mulch relative to no mulch.

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Abstract

Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L. ‘San Marzano’) was grown in the greenhouse under normal conditions. After pollination of flowers in the first truss, plants were transferred to growth chambers with either 95% or 55% RH, light and dark temperatures of 18° and 15°C, respectively, and a 16:8 hr, (light:dark) cycle. Blossom-end rot symptoms developed at the distal-end on the young green fruit within 15–16 days at 95% RH. Plant tissues from plants grown at high RH had lower Ca concentrations than comparative tissues of the low RH plants and exhibited increased growth compared to the low RH regime plants. The K content was affected indirectly by the high RH in most of the tested tissues.

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