Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 183 items for :

  • elite products x
Clear All
Author:

behind the introduction of the different citrus forms into the Mediterranean, distinguishing elite products from cash crops. Material and Methods This article combines the following line of evidence to trace the route of the western diffusion of citrus

Free access
Author:

A breeding program was initiated in 1990 to develop cream-, blackeye-, and pinkeye-type southernpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.)] cultivars homozygous for the gc gene conditioning green cotyledons. The green cotyledon trait allows harvest at the near-dry seed stage of maturity without loss of the seed's fresh green color. The ability to select for the gc gene in the embryo stage greatly facilitated its use in breeding programs, and the development of advanced breeding lines has proceeded at an accelerated rate. Sixteen F9 and 15 F10 breedinglines homozygous at the gc locus were available for preliminary field testing in 1995. The results of this field testing indicate that the efforts to incorporate the gc gene into elite horticultural germplasm have been successful. More importantly, the results of tests conducted with seed harvested at the dry stage of maturity indicate that several of the lines should produce an excellent processed product.

Free access

Twenty-two muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia) cultivars wars planted in a 4-replication randomized complete block design to 1) accumulate elite germplasm 2) evaluate germplasm and catalog traits that are potentially useful in breeding programs for improving quality and reducing diseases of muscadines consumed as wine, unfermented products, or fresh fruit, and 3) identify cultivars that have acceptable fresh fruit quality. Harvest date ranged from 25 August 92 for 'Southland,' 'Sugargate,' and 'Summit' to 17 September 92 for 'Doreen,' and 'Watergate'. 'Magnolia,' 'Doreen,' 'Janebell,' 'Higgins,' 'Carlos,' and *Welder' produced the highest yields and 'Sugargate,' 'Black Beauty,' 'Fry Seedless,' 'Jumbo,' and 'Sweet Jenny' were the lowest yielding cultivars. The largest berries were produced by 'Black Beauty,' 'Sweet Jenny,' 'Sugargate,' 'Supreme,' and 'Jumbo'. 'Fry Seedless,' 'Nobel,' 'Welder,' 'Doreen,' 'Hunt,' 'Southland,' and 'Sterling' produced the smallest berries. Virtually no ripe rot was found on any cultivar. 'Doreen,' Fry Seedless,' 'Nobel,' 'Supreme,' and 'Welder' were practically free of all disease. The most promising fresh fruit cultivars were 'Supreme,' 'Sweet Jenny,' and 'Black Beauty'.

Free access

Sweetpotato roots, especially the cultivar Beauregard, tend to experience epidermal loss during harvest and postharvest handling which results in a less attractive product in the market. A survey study was conducted among North Carolina (N.C.) sweetpotato growers in Fall 2001 and 2002. The purpose of the survey was to gather information and try to correlate cultural practices, growing conditions and site characteristics with the occurrence of attractive roots and to define new scientific approaches to reducing epidermal loss. Samples were obtained from 42 N.C. farms. Survey field information and laboratory results were correlated to identify possible factors affecting the appearance of the roots. 1300 roots were used to measure skin adhesion, peeling susceptibility, skin moisture, skin anthocyanin and lignin content. From survey questions, 50 characteristics were defined for each sample, according to field characteristics, cultivar information, cultural practices and harvest and postharvest practices. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the relationship between the skin characteristics analyzed at the laboratory, and the survey descriptors information. Analysis of variance was used for laboratory data analysis. Person correlations were made between survey variables and laboratory characteristics. Several possible relationships between root appearance and other characteristics/practices were identified. Root skin adhesion may improve in later generations from elite propagation material. Early application of phosphate and potash fertilizers were correlated to improved root skin adhesion. There appeared to be a relationship between soil moisture at harvest time, increased lignin content in the skin and peeling susceptibility. Future areas of study were identified.

Free access

Composts vary in their ability to suppress disease activity when incorporated into growing media. Bioassays that enable a reliable and quick assessment of compost's ability to suppress disease activity can save time, funds and space. A bioassay using Lupinu× `Russell Hybrid' seedlings was evaluated as a short-term test for gauging the ability of three composts to suppress activity of P. cinnamomi. Colonized millet seeds were prepared via the V-8 agar method. The colonized millet seed were incorporated into the potting media at 0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 colonized millet seed/200 cc of the media used. Three composts, including composted sewage sludge, brewer's waste and cow manure, were incorporated into the media (50% sand: 50% sphagnum peat, by volume) at rates of 0%, 10%, 25%, and 50%, by volume. The media, including the inoculated millet seed, were placed in small plastic pots (7.6-cm-diameter and 6.7 cm high), after which 10 Lupine seeds were sowed in each pot. Percentage of seedling loss was determined after 43 days of observation. The composted sewage sludge and the cow manure proved suppressive at the 50% incorporation rate and the 10% and 25% rate of the latter compost. The brewer's waste compost proved ineffective in this regard; thus, research with this product was discontinued. In a greenhouse study the same inoculation and compost incorporation rates were used, but rooted cuttings of Rhododendro × PJM `Elite' were plotted into the various treatments. Suppression of disease activity by the composts was significant 2 and 4 months after initiation of treatments. Significance in disease suppression noted between these treatments decreased significantly during the fifth month of the experiment.

Free access

placement of yield component QTL and their successful introgression in elite germplasm using MAS ( Fan et al., 2006 ; Fazio et al., 2003b ). Hybrid production in cucumber is typified by the ubiquitous use of closely related, elite lines (3

Free access

Cucumber ( Cucumis sativus L.; 2n = 2x = 14) is produced worldwide and is consumed as a fresh (fresh or slicing types) or as a processed vegetable [processing or pickling types and as a cooked vegetable (e.g., China)] product in several market

Free access
Author:

study was to understand contemporary North American lettuce germplasm by surveying public and proprietary cultivars of 1970 to 2004 by: 1) identifying the most elite progenitor cultivars by tabulating the cumulative number of times each cultivar has been

Free access

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations has recommended camellia oil as a high-quality, healthy vegetable oil ( Ahmed and Wang, 2015 ). This paper reviews the resources of oil camellias developed in China, by-products from oil

Free access

national and international markets. Obtaining habanero pepper cultivars with high fruit quality, high yield, and pungency, has become imperative for those trying to improve their cultivation. Thus, a program for the improvement of the product is in

Free access