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Catherine S.M. Ku and David R. Hershey

Abbreviations: EC, electrical conductivity EC a , EC of the applied solution; EC e , EC of a saturated medium extract; ET, evapotranspiration; LF, leaching fraction; LR, leaching requirement; M a , mass of pot after irrigation when at container

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Catherine S.M. Ku and David R. Hershey

Abbreviations: EC, electrical conductivity; EC a , EC of the applied solution; EC e , EC of a saturated medium extract; ET, evapotranspiration; LF, leaching fraction; LI, leaching intensity; LR, leaching requirement; M a , mass of pot after

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Cristian Moya, Eduardo Oyanedel, Gabriela Verdugo, M. Fernanda Flores, Miguel Urrestarazu, and Juan E. Álvaro

. Table 2. Fertigation parameters and nutrient emissions to environment of nutrient solutions with different electrical conductivity (EC) levels (dS·m −1 ) used for tomato cultivation during the crop cycle. Water uptake decreased dramatically with

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Ryo Matsuda, Chieri Kubota, M. Lucrecia Alvarez, and Guy A. Cardineau

, and total leaf area at the end of experiment and rates of stem elongation and leaf development of transgenic tomato grown at conventional (control) or high electrical conductivity (EC); n = 3–6. Table 2. Mean net photosynthetic rate ( P n

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Jong-Goo Kang and Marc W. van Iersel

toxicities ( Dubey, 1996 ). Researchers previously have reported that higher than recommended leachate electrical conductivity (EC) can reduce plant growth ( Gislerød and Mortensen, 1990 ; James and van Iersel, 2001 ; Kang and van Iersel, 2001 ; Nemali and

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Erin M.R. Clark, John M. Dole, and Jennifer Kalinowski

added to DW with an EC of 0.4, 1.0, 1.5, 2.75, or 4.75 dS·m –1 . Solution pH was measured ( Table 1 ). Table 1. Electrical conductivity (EC) values used to determine the effect of EC on vase life of three cultivars of cut rose stems. Salts were

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Ariana P. Torres, Michael V. Mickelbart, and Roberto G. Lopez

container-grown crops. There are three accepted methods for monitoring substrate pH and electrical conductivity (EC) on-site: the pour-through (PT), the saturated media extract, and the 1:2 water:substrate (v/v) suspension test (1:2) ( Camberato et al., 2009

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Eugene K. Blythe and Donald J. Merhaut

The pour-through method was developed as a simple and rapid means of monitoring pH, soluble salts [electrical conductivity (EC)], and nutrient availability in the soil solution of containerized substrate ( Wright, 1984 , 1986 ). Solutions for

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Isidro Morales and Miguel Urrestarazu

three tomatoes with an accuracy of one hundredth of a gram. Table 2. Total tomato crop yield (kg·m −2 ) arranged according to size and electrical conductivity (EC) of the nutrient solution and fertigation supply with one and four drip manifolds. Sampling

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Andrea C. Landaverde, Jacob H. Shreckhise, and James E. Altland

of nonfiltered PT samples should be measured the day of collection because pH had increased by as much as 0.35 units by day 1 of storage. Table 1. pH and electrical conductivity (EC) in filtered (F) or nonfiltered (NF) pour-through water samples from