Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for :

  • edible amaranth x
Clear All

important C4 summer leafy vegetable (edible amaranth) for this study. A recent study on the effects of sudden increase in temperature on photosynthesis showed that net photosynthesis of Chinese cabbage is decreased when leaf temperature is greater than

Free access

application used for this study reflects a desire to minimize nitrate accumulation and leaching losses and to evaluate varieties for low-input, low-cost commercial production. Varieties. Ten amaranth varieties were included in the study. Most were edible

Full access
Authors: and

The population of U.S. Asians will increase by 41% and reach 12 million by the year 2000. Chinese cabbage, Pak Choi, Daikon, and Bitter melon have moved out of the ethnic market and are now in mainstream outlets. This study targeted a diverse range of cool and warm-season crops. Besides those listed above, this study evaluated varieties of Asian greens, Chinese brocolli, Allium, edible soybeam, melon, squash, cucumber, edible Chrysanthemum, amaranth, winged bean, yard-long bean, and edible soybean. A randomized complete block design was utilized, with three replications of row length, varying from 10 to 33 feet, depending on species tested. Direct seedlings of cool-season crops in February and September, 1989 resulted in good market quality and yield of many varieties. Work in 1990 will focus on width of the market window, market information, and grower access to markets.

Free access

Abstract

Six accessions of edible amaranths (Amaranthus spp. L.) of varied geographic and genotypic origin were grown in a soil enriched with 0, 50, or 100 kg·ha–1N. Leaves were harvested at 25, 35, 45, 55, and 65 days after germination (DAG) and analyzed for crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and NO3 N. In grain-bearing accessions, leaf CP content increased with N application but declined linearly over harvest dates. In vegetable types, leaf CP levels tended to fluctuate over time. In both types, NDF content declined with N application, whereas response to harvest date varied. Leaf NO3 increased two-fold in plants from fertilized plots compared to plants from unfertilized plots, but declined rapidly with time. Leaf content of NO3 did not exceed 239 mmol·kg–1 dry weight with any N fertilization treatment. Edible amaranth appeared to be adapted to soils and climate of the southeastern United States. A. tricolor was most susceptible to disease among the accessions evaluated.

Open Access

MB and PL enhanced β-carotene in Amaranth compared with NPK but that of Celosia and Gboma was enhanced by MB and NPK fertilizer. Total phenolic content was higher among Amaranth plants receiving NPK, whereas those for Long Bean were greater among

Free access

of the fruit, local sourcing, and consumption in social settings were all viewed as important. Subjects also liked the ideas of fruit in between the size of an orange and a mandarin, fruit with edible peels, and fruit varieties with recognizable names

Open Access

varieties developed in pre-Columbian times for their edible grain; these continue to be grown on a small scale in Mexico, Central America, and parts of South America ( Harley and Ehleringer, 1987 ). Amaranth is rich in antioxidants ( Kelawala and

Free access

, fuel, invertebrate use, building and cloth material, social use, etc.). At least 28,187 plant species are used in medicine ( Royal Botanical Garden Report, 2017 ). The number of edible plants is estimated to be ≈30,000 ( Warren, 2015 ; Food Plant

Open Access

experiments before each weed removal period. Harvested weeds were dried at 80 °C for 72 h and weighed to determine aboveground dry biomass. Snap bean was harvested by hand from the two middle rows of each plot at the optimum edible maturity stage to determine

Free access

smooth pigweed control to oxyfluorfen early during the season, but its efficacy decreased over time, with only 65% control by 8 WAT. Meyers et al. (2010 ) reported at least 95% palmer amaranth ( Amaranthus palmeri ) control 2 WAT with S -metolachlor at

Open Access