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David Picha* and Roger Hinson

Opportunities for marketing United States (U.S.) sweetpotatoes in the United Kingdom (U.K.) are expanding, particularly within the retail sector. The U.K. import volume has steadily increased in recent years. Trade statistics indicate the U.K. imported nearly 12 thousand metric tons of sweetpotatoes in 2002, with the U.S. providing slightly over half of the total import volume. Considerable competition exists among suppliers and countries of origin in their attempts to penetrate the U.K. market. Currently, over a dozen countries supply sweetpotatoes to the U.K., and additional countries are planning on sending product in the near future. An economic assessment of production and transport costs was made among the principal supplying nations to estimate their comparative market advantages. Price histories for sweetpotatoes in various U.K. market destinations were compiled to determine seasonality patterns. Comparisons of net profit (or loss) between U.S. and U.K. market destinations were made to determine appropriate marketing strategies for U.S. sweetpotato growers/shippers. Results indicated the U.K. to be a profitable and increasingly important potential market for U.S. sweetpotatoes.

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Olya Rysin, Amanda McWhirt, Gina Fernandez, Frank J. Louws, and Michelle Schroeder-Moreno

systems, which is especially important considering that some of the largest strawberry producing states (Florida and North Carolina) are located in this region [ U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 2015 ]. In this study, we address economic viability

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Carlos Carpio and D. Scott NeSmith

This study evaluates the effect of irrigation on the profitability of the muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifilia) operation. Data from a 3-year experiment in which muscadine grapes were grown under four irrigation regimes were used to establish the relationship between yields and irrigation. Assuming a muscadine fruit price of $0.50/lb, harvesting costs of $0.21/lb, and irrigation costs of $16.75/acre-inch, the profit-maximizing level of irrigation was estimated to be 13.1 acre-inches for a season, or 7 gal/day per plant. Water requirements for profit maximization are 9% lower than water requirements for yield maximizing. Moreover, it is concluded that the effect of an adequate use of irrigation in the profitability of the muscadine grape operation can be substantial.

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R. Dudley Williams and Nancy A. Reichert

Two types of ground kenaf core (fresh and aged) were used in concentrations from 70% to 100% (v/v) in combination with peat for use as greenhouse potting media and were compared to two commercial mixes in completely randomized block designs. Greenhouse crops of Boston fern (Nephrolepis), impatiens, and pansies (Viola) were grown in the different mixes. Irrigation was conducted regularly, based primarily on the average need of all the plants. Kenaf-based media did not retain water as well as the commercial mixes. Consequently, impatiens and pansies displayed slower growth rates. However, no differences were noted for fern growth in 70% kenaf compared to commercial mixes. A second study on plants that were grouped by media type and watered as needed provided different results. Ferns grew equally well in all media, but impatiens grew best in 70% fresh kenaf. Kenaf-based media were less costly than the commercial mixes, and the cost decreased steadily as the kenaf proportion increased. The lower cost of kenaf coupled with the decreasing availability of peat should make kenaf-based media an attractive alternative to conventional greenhouse potting media.

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R. Dudley Williams, Brian S. Baldwin, and Nancy A. Reichert

Two types of ground kenaf core (fresh and aged) were used in concentrations from 70% to 100% (v/v) in combination with peat for use as greenhouse potting media, and were compared to two commercial mixes in completely randomized-block designs. Greenhouse crops of Boston fern (Nephrolepis), Impatiens, and pansies (Viola) were grown in the different mixes. Irrigation was conducted regularly, based primarily on the average need of all the plants. Kenaf-based media did not retain water as well as the commercial mixes; consequently, impatiens and pansies displayed slower growth rates. However, no differences were noted for fern growth in 70% kenaf compared to commercial mixes. A second study on plants that were grouped by media type and watered as needed provided different results. Ferns grew equally well in all media, but Impatiens grew best in 70% fresh kenaf. Kenaf-based media were less costly than the commercial mixes, and the cost decreased steadily as the kenaf proportion increased. The lower cost of kenaf, coupled with the decreasing availability of peat, should make kenaf-based media an attractive alternative to conventional greenhouse potting media.

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Thomas H. Spreen, Jean-Paul Baldwin, and Stephen H. Futch

, Hodges and Rahmani (2009 ) estimated that the economic value of the citrus industry on the economy of Florida was $8.9 billion. HLB affects citrus trees by blocking the phloem or the vascular system of the tree, limiting its ability to transport nutrients

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Hector German Rodriguez, Jennie Popp, Curt Rom, Heather Friedrich, and Jason McAfee

markets of both fresh and processed fruit, but significant challenges exist. These challenges include a lack of information available on the economic impacts of different organic production practices and the potential returns available from organic

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Robin G. Brumfield, Laura B. Kenny, Alyssa J. DeVincentis, Andrew K. Koeser, Sven Verlinden, A.J. Both, Guihong Bi, Sarah T. Lovell, and J. Ryan Stewart

indirect measure of damage from additional CO 2 emissions and is an approximation of how climate change affects economic welfare ( Moore et al., 2017 ; Nordhaus, 2017 ). Companies with environmentally conscious practices can increase profitability by

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Ramón A. Arancibia, Cody D. Smith, Don R. LaBonte, Jeffrey L. Main, Tara P. Smith, and Arthur Q. Villordon

irrigation at Chase, LA, in 2010 and 2011. Economic assessment. The cost-benefit analysis of changing plant density resulted in no changes in the net benefit because U.S. no.1, jumbo, and marketable yields were not different among row width and in-row plant

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Dewayne L. Ingram, Charles R. Hall, and Joshua Knight

to the development of a complex, yet systematic process called life cycle assessment [LCA ( Ingram and Fernandez, 2012 )]. This tool has international acceptance by the scientific community, is governed by international standards, and has application