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Au Trung Vo, Imane Haddidi, Hussein Daood, Zoltan Mayer and Katalin Posta

Eclipta prostrata belongs to the Asteraceae family, and it is distributed throughout the world in more than 83 countries ( Holm et al., 1979 ). E. prostrata is valued for traditional Chinese herbal medicine to treat diseases such as diabetes type

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Debalina Saha, S. Christopher Marble, Brian Pearson, Héctor Pérez, Gregory MacDonald and D. Calvin Odero

. Following mulch removal, 20 seeds of either eclipta, large crabgrass, or garden spurge were surface sown to the previously mulched pots and used as bioassay species to assess herbicide adsorption to mulch. Eclipta was used for indaziflam, large crabgrass for

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Paul C. Bartley III, Glenn R. Wehtje, Anna-Marie Murphy, Wheeler G. Foshee III and Charles H. Gilliam

-stalked phyllanthus, eclipta, and spotted spurge) were tested, each receiving all treatments. Each treatment was replicated five times for a total of 60 pots per weed species. On 26 May 2014 and on 13 Apr. 2015, no. 10 squat containers (C6900S; Nursery Supplies

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Debalina Saha, S. Christopher Marble, Brian J. Pearson, Héctor E. Pérez, Gregory E. MacDonald and Dennis C. Odero

) showed that 1 inch of PB mulch reduced garden spurge and eclipta fresh weights (FWs) and weed counts by more than 80% compared with a nonmulched control. Reviews of different mulch materials as a sole means for weed control have been summarized for

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Diana L. Berchielli-Robertson, Charles H. Gilliam and Donna C. Fare

A 2-year study evaluated the effects of three weed species: eclipta [Eclipta alba (L.) Hasskarl], prostrate spurge (Euphorbia supina Raf.), and wood sorrel (Oxalis stricta L.) on growth of container-grown `Gumpo White Sport' azalea (Rhododendron eriocarpum), R. x `Fashion', and Berberis thunbergii DC. var. atropurpurea `Crimson Pigmy'. Competitiveness among weed species as ranked from greatest to least was eclipta, prostrate spurge, and wood sorrel. Greater populations of eclipta and prostrate spurge resulted in decreased shoot dry weight of `Fashion' and `Gumpo White Sport' azalea. Prostrate spurge had a similar effect on `Crimson Pigmy' barberry in both small (3.8-liter) and large (15.2-liter) containers, while eclipta reduced shoot dry weight of barberry only in large containers. Wood sorrel had little effect on shoot dry weight of `Fashion' and `Gumpo White Sport' azalea.

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Jeffrey F. Derr

The tolerance of transplanted lanceleaf coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata L.), ox-eye daisy (Chrysanthemum leucantheum L.), purple cone flower [Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench.], and blanket flower (Gaillardia aristata Pursh) to metolachlor was determined in field trials. Metolachlor at 4.5 kg·ha-1 (maximum use rate) and 9.0 kg·ha-1 (twice the maximum use rate) did not reduce stand or flowering of any wildflower species after one or two applications, although plants developed transient visible injury. Combining metolachlor with the broadleaf herbicides simazine or isoxaben resulted in unacceptable injury and stand reduction, especially in ox-eye daisy. Metolachlor plus oxadiazon was less injurious to the wildflowers than metolachlor plus either simazine or isoxaben. Treatments containing metolachlor controlled yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.) by at least 89% in both experiments. Treatments containing isoxaben controlled eclipta (Eclipta alba L.). 100% in both studies. Chemical names used: N-[3-(1-ethyl-1-methylpropyl)-5-isoxazolyl]-2,6-dimethoxybenzamide (isoxaben); 2-chloro -N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl) -N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide (metolachlor); 3-[2,4-di-chloro-5-(1-methylethoxy)phenyl]-5-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-2-(3 H) -one (oxadiazon); 6-chloro -N,N' -diethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (simazine).

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Wayne C. Porter

Rye, wheat, hairy vetch, ryegrass, and Austrian winterpea were evaluated for effects on weed control and sweetpotato production. Sweetpotatoes were transplanted into these cover crops after the cover crops had been killed with glyphosate and mowed. One-half of each plot was treated with clomazone herbicide and one-half was not treated. Plots with rye residues contained fewer goosegrass, rice flatsedge, ground cherry, and smooth pigweed plants than other cover crop plots. Sweetpotato plant vigor was greatest in the rye plots. Goosegrass, crabgrass, groundcherry, and eclipta were controlled in cover crop plots treated with clomazone. Sweetpotato plant vigor was better in the plots treated with clomazone than in plots with a cover crop only. Highest yields of no. 1 grade and total marketable sweetpotatoes were in rye and ryegrass cover crop plots, with or without clomazone. Sweetpotatoes grown in Austrian winterpea plots without clomazone produced the lowest yields. There was an increase in yield of sweetpotatoes in all cover crop plots treated with clomazone.

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Cody J. Stewart, S. Christopher Marble, Brian J. Pearson and P. Christopher Wilson

one eclipta ( Eclipta prostrata L.) plant. Other studies have also reported similar growth reductions from a wide variety of weed species on many different ornamental crops ( Norcini and Stamps, 1994 ; Walker and Williams, 1989 ). Research has shown

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S. Christopher Marble, Andrew K. Koeser and Gitta Hasing

applications. In container plant production, Cochran et al., (2009) reported that a 2.5-cm (1 inch) layer of pine bark mini-nuggets reduced weed counts of eclipta ( Eclipta prostrata L.) by 87% and spotted spurge ( Chamaesyce maculata L.) by 90% compared

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Ana V. de Souza, José E.B.P. Pinto, Suzan K.V. Bertolucci, Ricardo M. Corrêa, Larissa C. do B. Costa and William E. Dyer

), Clitoria ternatea ( Rout, 2005 ), Rauvolfia tetraphylla ( Faisal et al., 2005 ), Eclipta alba ( Baskaran and Jayabalan, 2005 ), Rudgea viburnoides ( Bonilla, 2002 ), Tournefortia paniculata ( Bertolucci et al., 2000 ), and Echinodorus sp