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Container crops in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) are grown primarily in Douglas fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco] bark (DFB). Similar to pine ( Pinus taeda L.) bark in the southeast U.S., DFB comprises the highest portion of most

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Container nurseries in Oregon use fresh and aged douglas fir bark (DFB). Although there is no general agreement as to what constitutes fresh, aged, or composted bark, the terms are used frequently in the nursery industry. For clarity, we offer the

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Container crops in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) are grown primarily in Douglas fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco] bark (DFB). Similar to Loblolly pine ( Pinus taeda L.) bark in the southeast United States, DFB comprises the highest

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Ornamental container crops in the Pacific Northwest are grown primarily in Douglas fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco] bark (DFB). Similar to pine ( Pinus taeda L .) bark in the southeast United States, DFB comprises the highest portion

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separated using detachable cylindrical rings from a unique, engineered device. Douglas fir bark (DFB) used in soilless substrates in the northwest United States is commonly categorized as fine or medium bark when passing thru a 0.9-cm or 2.2-cm sieve

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Ornamental container crops in the Pacific Northwest are grown primarily in douglas fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco] bark (DFB). Similar to pine ( Pinus taeda L.) bark in the southeast United States, DFB comprises the highest portion

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. Growers also often use inexpensive, locally available organic products such as milled tree bark as a substrate for containers. In the northwestern United States, douglas fir bark is widely available as a by-product from the logging industry and is commonly

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porosity (TP), air space (AS), and container capacity (CC). The most common substrate components use in the Oregon nursery industry is douglas fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii Mirb. (Franco)] bark (DFB), sphagnum peatmoss, and pumice. Each of these individual

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substrates: 1) storm debris + biosolids compost mixed 1:1 (by volume) with douglas fir bark (bark); 2) construction debris + biosolids compost mixed 1:1 with bark; 3) horse waste + biosolids compost mixed 1:1 with bark; 4) Dairy manure-food waste anaerobic

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. 2 ) for describing MCCs of bark-based soilless substrates. Materials and Methods General procedures. Douglas fir bark [DFB (screened to 0.9 cm)] was collected from stockpiles intended for nursery container production (Marr Brothers Monmouth, OR

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